How to Reduce Inflammation Naturally

Find out the difference between acute and chronic inflammation (one is good, one is bad). Also learn about the natural ways to reduce inflammation and improve your health through lifestyle, exercise, diet, and supplementation. 

Inflammation is one of those necessary evils. Yes, you need an inflammatory response in the body to alert you and your healing resources that something is wrong, and that is healthy inflammation. A twisted ankle, a reaction to stress, a bug or mosquito bite: these are common external examples of inflammation that let you know: you’ve hurt your ankle, you need a vacation, or it’s time to reapply the bug spray.

Unhealthy inflammation is chronic and persistent inflammation that is no longer helping you, only hurting. For instance if your ankle swells up so badly you can’t walk, you have to put ice on it, elevate it, maybe take an anti-inflammatory medication. But how do you reduce inflammation inside your body? You can’t ice your liver! Moreover how do you reduce inflammation naturally, without resorting to taking over-the-counter drugs and risking their side effects? Read on to find ways to reduce overall inflammation through lifestyle, diet, and natural supplements.

What Is Inflammation? Acute vs. Chronic

Acute inflammation is the immune system’s response to injury or foreign substance. It activates inflammation to deal with a specific threat, and then subsides. That inflammatory response includes the increased production of immune cells, cytokines, and white blood cells. The physical signs of acute inflammation are swelling, redness, pain, and heat. This is the healthy function of inflammation.

Chronic inflammation on the other hand is not beneficial to the body, and occurs when your immune system regularly and consistently releases inflammatory chemicals, even when there’s no injury to fix or foreign invader to fight.

To diagnosis chronic inflammation, doctors test for blood markers like interleukin-6 (IL-6), TNF alpha, homocysteine, and C-reactive protein (CRP). This type of inflammation often results from lifestyle factors such as poor diet, obesity, and stress, and is associated with many dangerous health conditions, including:

These are the conditions that can be caused or exacerbated by chronic inflammation, but what causes chronic inflammation itself? There are a few factors.

Habitually consuming high amounts of high-fructose corn syrup, sugar, refined carbs (like white bread), trans fats, and the vegetable oils included in so many processed foods is one contributor. Excessive alcohol intake is another culprit, and so is an inactive or sedentary lifestyle.

Now that you know what chronic inflammation is, where it comes from, and how it works, the final question is: how can you reduce chronic inflammation with natural remedies? Read on for the answers.

How to reduce inflammation naturally.

How to Reduce Inflammation Naturally Through Lifestyle, Diet, and Supplements

Here are several approaches you can take to combat inflammation naturally before resorting to over-the-counter drugs or medications.

Lifestyle Choices and Therapies to Fight Inflammation

Chronic inflammation is also called low-grade or systemic inflammation. There are some ways you can boost your health by managing lifestyle practices and fitness activities. Some practices you may want to adjust are as follows.

  • Avoid smoking
  • Limit alcohol consumption
  • Manage stress naturally (meditation perhaps, or tai chi)
  • Get sufficient sleep
  • Exercise regularly

When it comes to exercise, something as readily available as walking can help improve your health drastically, and when it comes to fitness with meditation, you could look into yoga. Those who practice yoga regularly have lower levels of the inflammatory marker IL-6, up to 41% lower than those who don’t practice yoga.

An Anti-Inflammatory Diet

A diet of anti-inflammatory foods is a huge component to reducing inflammation. As a general rule, you want to eat whole foods rather than processed foods, as they contain more nutrients and antioxidants for your health. Antioxidants help by reducing levels of free radicals in your body, molecules that cause cell damage and oxidative stress.

You’ll also want a healthy dietary balance between carbs, protein, fats, fruits, and veggies to ensure the proper amount of minerals, vitamins, and fiber throughout each day. One diet that’s been scientifically shown to have anti-inflammatory properties is the Mediterranean diet, which entails a high consumption of vegetables, along with olive oil and moderate amounts of lean protein.

Foods to Eat

Healthy eating can help you reduce inflammation in your body. These foods are the answer to how to reduce intestinal inflammation naturally. Reach inside and soothe what ails you!

  • High-fat fruits: Stone fruits like avocados and olives, including their oils
  • Whole grains: Whole grain wheat, barley, quinoa, oats, brown rice, spelt, rye, etc.
  • Vegetables: Leafy green and cruciferous vegetables especially, like kale, broccoli and broccoli greens, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage
  • Fruit: Dark berries like cherries and grapes particularly, either fresh or dried
  • Fatty fish: Salmon, anchovies, sardines, herring, and mackerel for omega-3 fatty acids
  • Nuts: Walnuts, almonds, cashews, Brazil nuts, etc.
  • Spices: Including turmeric, cinnamon, and fenugreek
  • Tea: Green tea especially
  • Red wine: Up to 10 ounces of red wine for men and 5 ounces for women per day
  • Peppers: Chili peppers and bell peppers of any color
  • Chocolate: Dark chocolate specifically, and the higher the cocoa bean percentage, the better

Foods to Avoid

These foods can help cause inflammation and amplify negative inflammatory effects in your body. You’d do well to reduce intake of or avoid entirely.

  • Alcohol: Hard liquors, beers, and ciders
  • Desserts: Candies, cookies, ice creams, and cakes
  • Processed meats: Sausages, hot dogs, and bologna
  • Trans fats: Foods containing partially hydrogenated ingredients like vegetable shortening, coffee creamer, ready-to-use frosting, and stick butter
  • Sugary beverages: Sugar-sweetened fruit juices, sports drinks, etc.
  • Refined carbs: White bread, white pasta, and white rice
  • Processed snacks: Crackers, pretzels, and chips
  • Certain oils and fried foods: Foods prepared with processed vegetable and seed oils like soybean oil, canola oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, etc.

When it comes to how to reduce liver inflammation naturally, what you avoid is just as important as what you put into your body, which is why it’s also recommended to quit smoking and avoid secondhand smoke and to limit your contact with toxic chemicals like aerosol cleaners.

Anti-Inflammatory Natural Supplements

You can help treat inflammation by including certain supplements that reduce inflammation.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Supplements like fish oil contain omega-3 fatty acids, and while eating fatty fish can also provide this nutrient, not everyone has the access or means to eat two to three helpings of fish per week.

Though both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential to get from our diets, we often have a drastic overabundance of omega-6s and not nearly enough omega-3s to keep the ideal ratio between the two. Likewise, while red meat and dairy products may have anti-inflammatory effects, red meat and dairy are also prohibitive on certain diets and health care regimens (for example, red meat is not recommended for those with heart-health concerns). Supplementing with omega-3 fatty acids or fish oil can help defeat pro-inflammatory factors.

Herbs and Spices

Curcumin, found in the curry spice turmeric, has been shown to fight back against pro-inflammatory cytokines. And ginger also has been found to reduce inflammation even more successfully than NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like aspirin, and with fewer side effects. Whether fresh or dried, certain herbs and spices can help reduce inflammation without having any detriment to your overall health.

Flame Off

With these tips, you can help reduce chronic inflammation in your life naturally, and the rewards for taking such precise care of yourself could be great. Those on an anti-inflammatory diet, for example, may find that certain health problems improve, from inflammatory bowel syndrome, to arthritis, to lupus and other autoimmune disorders. Not only that, but a healthier lifestyle leads almost invariably to lowered risk of developing chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, obesity, depression, and cancer. You’ll have better cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood sugar levels, plus an improvement in mood and energy. The bottom line is: lowering your levels of inflammation naturally increases your quality of life!

How to Speed up Healing: From Sunburns to Surgery Recovery

The wound healing process, much like our physical activity levels, tends to decline as we age. Here are some scientifically backed tips on the best ways to speed up healing, from minor cuts and scrapes around the home, to post-surgical recovery and muscle tissue rebuilding.

Whether you have a cut, a burn, or are healing from a surgical procedure, there are ways to help speed up healing and close your wounds faster. The wound healing process, much like our physical activity levels, tends to decline as we age. The older we get, the longer our healing time takes, leading in some instances to chronic wounds that never really go away. To speed up wound repair, here are some tips for helping your body along.

Speed up healing: from sunburns to surgery.

At-Home Healing: Small Wounds and Scar Reduction

When it comes to home remedies for wound care, there are a lot of old wives’ tales still around. Some of them make a certain amount of sense when considered scientifically, like waiting 30 minutes to swim after you eat may well help you avoid a minor cramp. However, not all of these folktales are true enough to keep repeating or insisting on. Not everyone will get a minor cramp if they swim after eating, and even if they do, it won’t cause them to drown. And yet still we wait, and tell children to wait, and keep the myth going.

When it comes to how to speed up wound healing, there are a lot of practices that don’t really apply. Some say leaving a wound open to dry in the air and “breathe” helps it heal faster, but that isn’t true if it’s now open to dirt and possible infection. To stop infection, many douse a wound in alcohol or peroxide—talk about pouring salt on a wound!

In truth, leaving a wound to dry out is not ideal, and can even slow healing and increase pain. Wounds need moisture to heal, and moist wound healing speeds up healing and reduces scarring. Here are some other tips on how to foster faster healing and reduce the risk of scarring.

1. Clean and Disinfect

Before touching a wound, wash your hands. When it comes to cleaning the wound, start with clear water and a clean cloth to remove any dirt or particles from the wound. If there are pieces of debris in a wound (your kid took a wipeout on their skateboard and has gravel embedded in the scrape, for example), use a pair of tweezers to remove them. The tweezers should be sterilized with some isopropyl alcohol, but alcohol is not advised directly on the open wound.

Instead, once the wound is clean, apply an antibiotic cream, ointment, or spray to the wound area, and make your call about what kind of bandage applies. If it’s an open wound like a wide scrape, a gauze and a wrap may be called for, but a cut on a finger might need only a bandaid to reduce the risk of infection and speed healing.

Remember not to pick at any scab that forms, because a scab is the body’s natural bandage.

2. Encourage Blood Flow

Nobody can heal you better than your own body, but there are ways to help it along. You’ll notice when you get a scrape or a bruise that the area seems to heat up. That’s because the body has dispatched its in-house medical team via your bloodstream.

To increase blood flow to the skin and surrounding area, you can apply a heating pad or hot water bottle, or place the wound area in some warm water for 15-30 minutes. It’s not a high-tech method but it does help, especially for wounds on your extremities (fingers, toes, arms, and legs) where your blood vessels are smaller, or for anyone with poor circulation, like the elderly.

If adding heat is uncomfortable, massaging the surrounding area is another way to usher blood to the site of injury.

3. Reduce Inflammation

After encouraging healthy blood flow, your wound may experience unhealthy inflammation. A burn that you got from pulling dinner out of the oven might feel like it’s still burning for days after, and you’ll want some kind of anti-inflammatory to help relieve the pain.

Many people think of the gel-like insides of the aloe vera plant for burns, and this is an age-old home remedy that actually works! Aloe vera is a succulent plant originally native to Africa that has a gooey substance in its leaves called mucilaginous juice, and while the plant is 99% water, it does have two chemicals within that improve wound healing.

According to researchers, many of the healing effects of aloe vera are due to the glycoproteins and polysaccharides present in the plant’s pulp. The polysaccharides increase cellular movement, leading to faster tissue regrowth, and the glycoproteins help relieve pain and control the inflammatory response. Together these compounds aid and possibly improve your immune system.

There is even more evidence out of a 2015 study that suggests there are further helpful compounds in aloe vera for cutaneous wounds (like sunburns). For instance, glucomannan stimulates the growth of fibroblasts responsible for collagen, skin cell, and tissue building. Other chemicals found in aloe vera may also help foster blood vessel regrowth, making it a fantastic, natural anti-inflammatory to have on hand for minor wound healing.

4. Get More Protein, Vitamins, and Nutrients

There are certain power foods that contain the nutrients your body needs to rebuild itself, including vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and magnesium. You’ll find these nutrients in dark green leafy vegetables and in orange, yellow, and red fruits and veggies (eat the rainbow!), like bell peppers, tomatoes, oranges, and more.

One of the biggest factors when it comes to tissue and wound healing though? Protein. Omega-3s come from fish along with fish’s protein content, and you can get an assortment of your essential amino acids from various meats and dairy products.

Amino acids are needed for wound healing, so if you’re not a meat-eater, you can increase your protein intake with certain vegetarian and vegan protein foods, or with an amino acid supplement while you heal.

How to Speed up Healing After Surgery

Outside of household and playground injuries, recovery after surgery is a whole different ball game. No matter where it is on the body or how good the chances for a speedy recovery are, surgery still carries a certain amount of risk, and so does surgical recovery. Once you’re sent home from your procedure, you’re going to want to heal as quickly and safely as possible. Here are some tips for how to do so.

1. Follow Your Doctor’s Instructions

While it’s true that no one knows your body quite like you do, doctors don’t give out suggestions willy-nilly. Their medical advice is based on data and research collected from all different kinds of patients over years and years of procedures.

If a doctor tells you to avoid activities for a specific amount of time after a procedure, it’s in your best interest to heed that advice. If you’re told to avoid driving, avoid sexual intercourse, avoid alcohol, or avoid lifting anything over 10 pounds for a couple of weeks, this is for your safety, and so you don’t end up back in their office with a new injury or complication. You may be feeling good enough to return to normal activity, and that’s great, it means your healing is right on course! And yet there may still be healing processes going on beneath your skin that need a little bit more time.

2. Eat the Right Recovery Foods

As true as it was for minor wounds, eating a nutrient-dense diet is even more important after a surgery, because you’re healing much deeper wounds. Although you may have a loss of appetite or digestive discomfort after a surgery, it’s important that you eat a healthy diet by any means necessary (broths, smoothies, amino acid powders), because certain foods are actually going to feed your recovery process.

Again, vitamin C and zinc can help with healing, and can be had from fruit and beans. Iron and vitamin B12 help in forming new blood cells and can be found in fish and eggs. Sports and sugary drinks should be avoided for the time being, as should refined sugar foods.

Protein is more important than ever, as many surgeries by nature involve cutting through tissue and muscle, and the amino acids in protein can help speed post-surgical recovery. Meat, poultry, fish, and eggs are all strong sources of protein, but if a doctor tells you to take a protein supplement, look for a comprehensive amino acid supplement. For recovering after surgery, you may need more protein than a normal diet or your appetite can provide, and supplementing may be a necessity.

3. Follow-up, Ask For Help, and Get Moving Gradually

Surgical recovery may take a while and involve follow-up appointments, physical therapy, and/or at-home assistance. During this time, it’s important to keep all appointments with your health care team, because a diagnostic such as bloodwork could alert your doctor to a problem before it becomes an infection. Likewise, physical therapy could help you correct something like a limp before it becomes a misalignment.

Asking for help from your family or your medical team may not be your usual tendency, but it is necessary and encouraged for the sake of a speedy and successful recovery. If problems are allowed to fester, you could end up back in the hospital or on bedrest, and in danger of new problems altogether, like muscle atrophy.

4. Don’t Smoke

This is a tip that may not apply to all, so if you don’t smoke or have never smoked, skip ahead. However, if you are a smoker or live with one, the effects of cigarette smoking can counteract your wound healing.

Nicotine tightens blood vessels, and the more constricted your blood vessels are, the harder it is for all the other recovery work you’re doing to matter. The nutrients you eat won’t be going to the right places, the muscle you’re building takes longer to thrive, your wounds take longer to heal, and more carcinogens and harmful substances are coming in at the same time. If you’ve ever wanted to quit smoking, after a surgery it’s more important than ever, and can make even more of a positive health impact.

The Need for Speed

Some things can’t be rushed, and a lot of the time your health is the tortoise racing against the hare: slow and steady wins the race. Diet and exercise are long-haul habits that make all the difference. While that’s also true when it comes to a lot of aspects of healing, the more you can do to support your body’s healing mechanisms and get out of their way, the faster the process goes and the lower the chance you’ll have any more problems arising from the initial issue.

Whether it’s a cut, a sunburn, a broken limb, or a surgical operation, anything can go from bad to worse if you’re not careful. Luckily there are resources you can use and advice to be had on how to speed up healing in a successful and sustainable way. Take these tips into consideration, seek medical advice if needed, and know that we wish you a speedy recovery.

Top 10 Foods with Magnesium

Utilized in hundreds of reactions within the body, magnesium is an important mineral for human functioning. Here are the top 10 foods with magnesium, their health benefits, and other nutrients they provide. 

Utilized in hundreds of reactions within the body, magnesium is an important mineral for human functioning. Foods with magnesium are the best way to get the recommended daily intake (RDI) of magnesium, which is 400 milligrams for adults. This article will let you know what magnesium does, what a magnesium deficiency feels like, and which foods high in magnesium will up your magnesium intake to the levels you need to be at optimal health.

Why You Need Magnesium

Magnesium is a co-factor for hundreds of the body’s enzyme reactions. These processes include DNA synthesis, bone health, blood sugar balance, blood pressure regulation, muscle contractions, a functioning nervous system, and energy conversion from proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Magnesium is also thought to impact sleep quality.

Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency

Luckily, magnesium deficiency is not common in adults who are otherwise healthy. Our kidneys store magnesium for use in short-term magnesium lows, but during a long-term low intake of magnesium, it is possible to become deficient.

The most notable sign of inadequate magnesium levels is a dip in energy, but because magnesium has a hand in regulating calcium, vitamin D, and hormonal balance, low magnesium levels can lead to eye tics, anxiety, insomnia, muscle cramps, and fatigue. Here is a list of common symptoms of magnesium deficiency.

  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Muscle cramps and contractions
  • Numbness and tingling

When magnesium levels are low, you might start craving stimulants like coffee (a desire meant to boost our energy back up), or chocolate, which if it comes in the form of dark chocolate, would actually help, as dark chocolate is one of the foods with noteworthy magnesium content. Read on for more beneficial foods for magnesium deficiency.

Top 10 List of Foods with Magnesium

If you’re wondering which foods contain magnesium, you’ve arrived at your answer. Below are 10 magnesium-rich foods, and the other proven health benefits they can offer you.

The top 10 foods with magnesium.

1. Dark Chocolate

Not the sweet milk chocolate common around Halloween and Easter, but dark chocolate, which is both delicious and healthy in more ways than one. Dark chocolate is quite rich in magnesium, with 64 milligrams in a 1-ounce serving, or 16% of the recommended daily intake value. Dark chocolate also contains manganese, copper, and iron, plus prebiotic content, valuable for feeding your healthy gut bacteria.

The benefits don’t stop: dark chocolate is also full of antioxidants, nutrients that protect against the damage caused by free radicals in the body. The flavanols in dark chocolate contribute to heart health. These antioxidants help prevent harmful LDL cholesterol from sticking to the linings of your arteries. Make sure the dark chocolate you get is at least 70% cocoa solids. The higher the percentage, the more benefits you’ll gain.

2. Tofu

Well known as a staple of vegan and vegetarian diets thanks to its high protein content, tofu is a soy product, a bean curd made by pressing soybean milk into curd form. A serving of 100 grams of tofu contains 53 milligrams of magnesium, which is 13% of the recommended daily intake. That same serving size will bring you 10 grams of protein, as well as at least 10% of the RDI for manganese, iron, and selenium. Tofu is also among foods with high magnesium and calcium content.

Studies link eating tofu with a reduction of stomach cancer risk factors and improved health of your artery linings. Tofu is a top magnesium contender and one of the best sources for plant-based protein.

3. Avocados

The avocado has had a renaissance in recent years, acknowledged for being the incredibly nutritious superfood that it is. Avocados are stone fruits, tasty sources of healthy fats and magnesium, providing 58 milligrams for every medium avocado, 15% of the recommended daily intake.

It doesn’t stop there, avocados are especially heart healthy because they are high in both magnesium and potassium; not to mention, B vitamins and vitamin K. Avocados have valuable fiber for comfortable digestion, with 13 out of the 17 grams of carbs in the common avocado coming from fiber. Studies have found that eating avocados can improve cholesterol levels, reduce inflammation, and provide increased feelings of satiety after a meal.

4. Whole Grains

Whole grains like whole wheat, brown rice, oats, and barley, plus pseudocereals like quinoa and buckwheat are all sources of dietary magnesium, as well as various other nutrients. A 1-ounce serving of buckwheat for example has 65 milligrams of magnesium, 16% of the recommended daily intake.

Whole grains also tend to be high in B vitamins, manganese, fiber, and selenium, and have been shown to reduce unnecessary inflammation, which can then lend itself to a decreased risk of heart disease. Buckwheat and quinoa are also significantly higher in antioxidants and protein than traditional grain like corn, and they are gluten-free, so a great resource for those with celiac disease or a sensitivity to gluten.

5. Nuts

Nuts particularly high in magnesium include cashews, almonds, and Brazil nuts. A 1-ounce serving of cashews delivers 82 milligrams of magnesium, or 20% of the recommended daily intake. Nuts are also excellent sources of monounsaturated fat and fiber, making them good for regulating cholesterol levels and blood sugar for those with type 2 diabetes. Brazil nuts are high in selenium, providing over 100% of the recommended daily intake with just two nuts, but most nuts are equipped with anti-inflammatory properties and are beneficial for heart health.

6. Seeds

The majority of people in the modern world are not eating enough seeds. Whether it’s flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, chia seeds, or sunflower seeds, most seeds contain high levels of magnesium. Pumpkin seeds have an especially high amount of magnesium compared to other seeds, with 150 milligrams per 1-ounce serving, a remarkable 37% of the recommended daily intake.

Seeds are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids, monounsaturated fat, and iron, as well as high in dietary fiber. With antioxidants to protect against free radicals, flaxseeds specifically have been shown to reduce cholesterol and have been linked to breast cancer prevention. These tiny powerhouses of nutrients are easy to quickly add to your diet with trail mixes, smoothies, and overnight oat recipes.

7. Legumes

Legumes include chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils, peas, and soybeans. Not only do they contain magnesium (like black beans, which have 120 milligrams of magnesium per cooked cup, or 30% of the recommended daily intake), but legumes also provide a major plant-based food source of protein.

High in iron and potassium, both good for blood and heart health, legumes help decrease the risk of heart disease and improve blood sugar control when eaten regularly. Legumes also contain high amounts of fiber and have a low glycemic index number, making them a beneficial food for diabetics. Another legume resource: natto, a fermented soybean product that can provide you with vitamin K, valuable for bone health.

8. Bananas

Well known as a source of potassium, the banana is a popular fruit worldwide that can help reduce the risk of heart disease, and lower blood pressure. Bananas are also rich in magnesium, with one large banana containing as much as 37 milligrams, 9% of the recommended daily intake.

With vitamin C, manganese, fiber, and vitamin B6, bananas are nutritionally rich and highly convenient to eat: they come in their own protective peel and can easily be included in delicious treats like peanut butter banana smoothies, or made into a dairy-free version of ice cream if you freeze them.

While fully ripe bananas are higher in sugar and carbs than most other fruits, they are natural sugars, much better for your health than refined sugars. On top of that, a large amount of the carbs in unripe bananas are resistant starch, which doesn’t get absorbed and digested and may help lower blood sugar levels by reducing inflammation and promoting gut health.

9. Certain Fatty Fish

Fish have a lean protein content that can’t be beat, plus omega-3 fatty acids in certain oily fish like salmon, halibut, and mackerel provide an extra health boon. These fish are also high in magnesium, with half a fillet of salmon (about 178 grams) containing 53 milligrams of magnesium, or 13% of the recommended daily value. Fish are also rich in B vitamins, selenium, and potassium, and a regular intake of fatty fish has been scientifically linked to a decrease in heart disease and other chronic diseases.

10. Leafy Greens

Green, leafy vegetables are highly healthy, full of magnesium, iron, and large amounts of vitamins A, C, and K. Leafy greens include spinach, kale, Swiss chard, turnip greens, collard greens, and mustard greens. A cup of cooked spinach for example contains 157 milligrams of magnesium, a whopping 39% of the recommended daily intake. Moreover, the plant compounds in these leafy greens have been linked with anti-cancer properties and may help prevent DNA and cell damage.

Magnificent Magnesium

These healthful magnesium foods can help those with high blood pressure, diabetes, and high blood sugar. Before trying a magnesium supplement (which should be done under the guidance of health professionals), use these foods with high magnesium to try and get enough magnesium from your dietary sources first. Dietary supplements are important when needed, but nothing quite beats getting all the nutrients you need from a well-balanced diet, including magnesium.

Top 12 Foods with Zinc

Find out the symptoms and consequences of zinc deficiency, plus the top 12 foods that contain zinc and can provide you with this essential nutrient for your senses, growth, and healing. 

Zinc is a trace mineral found throughout the body that is necessary for our immune system’s function, cell growth and division, wound healing, and our senses of taste and smell. Zinc is needed in over 300 enzyme functions in the body, and yet the body doesn’t store zinc as a reserve. Instead, zinc is used as needed to metabolize nutrients, and so we need to get a regular supply of it via our food or dietary supplement. For men this means 11 milligrams of zinc per day, and for women, it’s 8 milligrams unless they are pregnant or breastfeeding, when the requirement jumps up to 12 milligrams per day. This article will explore the symptoms and consequences of zinc deficiency, plus arm you with a list of the top 12 foods with zinc, so you’ll never have to go without this important nutrient.

Symptoms of Zinc Deficiency and Those at Risk

If you are a vegetarian or vegan, you might be more prone to zinc deficiency due to a lack of meat in your diet. Likewise those with digestive diseases such as Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, or ulcerative colitis may develop a deficiency due to poor absorption rates. Those with certain cancers, alcohol addiction, or diabetes are also at a higher risk. Breastfeeding and pregnant women, the elderly, as well as children and teens run the risk of becoming zinc deficient more easily. What follows next is a list of symptoms, so you can better recognize the signs of zinc deficiency.

  • Slowed growth
  • Poor immune functioning
  • Appetite loss
  • Hair loss
  • Impaired wound healing
  • Diarrhea
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Compromised night vision
  • White spots on nails
  • A funny-tasting sensation
  • Lethargy
  • Fine tremors (unintentional muscle movements)

A moderate deficiency can be fixed with dietary changes. A severe deficiency may require zinc supplements and advice from a medical professional on how to best restore zinc levels.

The Top 12 Foods with Zinc

If you’re looking for foods high in zinc, look no further than the following list of top 12 zinc-rich foods.

The top 12 foods with zinc.

1. Legumes

Legumes include lentils, beans, and chickpeas, and are some of the best foods around for those who don’t eat meat to gain plant sources of protein and zinc. In 100 grams of lentils for example, you can get 12% of the daily recommended intake of zinc (for a man or pregnant/nursing woman).

Animal sources of zinc are better absorbed due to the fact that legumes also contain phytates, which can inhibit the absorption of zinc and other minerals. Regardless, legumes are an excellent source of fiber and protein that can be easily included in stews, salads, and soups—an easy and beneficial addition.

Bioavailability can also be increased with sprouting, fermenting, and soaking plant sources of zinc, which is great news for those seeking foods with zinc for vegan diets.

2. Meat

Meat is a strong source of zinc, especially red meat. Lamb, pork, bison, and beef are foods with high zinc and iron content, plus creatine and B vitamins. For zinc, raw ground beef contains 4.8 milligrams of zinc, 43% of a man’s RDI.

Though not everyone will want to eat large amounts of red meat due to its association with heart disease, it can still nevertheless be included moderately in a balanced diet to gain the positives without risking much in negative effects.

3. Seeds

Squash seeds, flaxseeds, sesame seeds, hemp seeds, and pumpkin seeds: all of these seeds help increase your zinc intake. They can be easily added to other foods like yogurts and salads, or enjoyed on their own as snacks in trail mixes or granola bars.

Some seeds contain more zinc than others. Hemp seeds in particular have 31% of a man’s RDI in just 3 tablespoons (30 grams) of seeds. That being said, sesame, squash, and pumpkin seeds each have significant amounts of zinc, as well as fiber, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. Including more seeds in your diet can help to lower blood pressure and reduce cholesterol, so they’re a fantastic resource for your health.

4. Shellfish

Shellfish like oysters and shrimp are low-calorie, healthy sources of zinc. Just six medium oysters can provide 32 milligrams of zinc, 290% of a man’s recommended daily intake. This category includes Alaskan crab, clams, scallops, mussels, and lobster.

It’s recommended that you cook shellfish thoroughly to avoid food poisoning, and also that you use a wet heat method of cooking like steaming, boiling, poaching, or braising instead of dry heat methods like grilling, broiling, sautéing, roasting, or baking, as those tend to reduce the zinc levels in shellfish.

5. Eggs

Eggs have about 5% of a man’s RDI per large whole egg, and they also bring 5 grams of healthy fats, 6 grams of protein, and vitamins and minerals. One of the foods with high zinc and selenium content, eggs also have an assortment of B vitamins and choline, which is important for many of the steps in our metabolism, and a nutrient that most of us do not get enough of from our diets.

6. Nuts

Cashews, almonds, peanuts (yes, we know technically they’re legumes but we’re eating them like nuts!), pine nuts, and more: all of these nuts can boost your zinc intake, as well as provide healthy fats, fiber, and a dazzling array of other vitamins and nutrients like iron, calcium, vitamin E, and folate.

Nuts are foods with zinc and magnesium, and among the nuts, your best source of zinc are cashews, with about 14% of a man’s RDI amount in a 1-ounce serving. Convenient, hearth healthy, and excellent for reducing the risk factors of diabetes, nuts have also been associated with greater longevity.

7. Certain Vegetables

Though vegetables and plant foods tend to be poorer sources of zinc than animal products, it’s nevertheless possible to get zinc from certain vegetables. For those who don’t eat meat, both sweet and regular potatoes have about 1 gram of zinc per large spud, 9% of a man’s daily recommended. Green veggies like green beans and kale contribute a small portion of zinc as well, about 3% of the RDI per 100 grams. While they may not contain a lot of zinc, greens like kale do contain chart-topping portions of vitamin K and vitamin A, and a vegetable-rich diet is associated with risk reduction for conditions like heart disease and cancer.

8. Dairy Products

Dairy products like milk and cheese have high amounts of particularly bioavailable zinc, meaning it’s more easily absorbed by your body. Just 100 grams of cheddar cheese has around 28% of a man’s RDI of zinc, and 1 cup of full-fat milk has about 9%. With calcium for bone health, vitamin D, and protein, dairy products are good sources of zinc, especially for any lacto-vegetarians.

9. Certain Fruits

Zinc-rich fruits include avocados, blackberries, pomegranate, raspberries, guava, cantaloupe, apricots, peaches, kiwifruit, and blueberries. With healthy fats in avocados and the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of berries, though they don’t have very much zinc content compared to animal sources, these fruits are nevertheless more food sources that can help keep your body plentiful with zinc.

10. Whole Grains

Wheat, rice, oats, and quinoa each contain some zinc, though like the legumes listed above, they also contain phytates that can bind with zinc and inhibit its absorption. Whole grains contain more phytates than refined grains do, but they are still better for your health overall, as they also contain nutrients like B vitamins, selenium, magnesium, iron, and valuable fiber. Eating whole grains is associated with a reduced risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease, and so very much worth including in your diet for the other health benefits they bring.

11. Dark Chocolate

Among the foods with zinc and copper, dark chocolate has pretty fair amounts of zinc, about 30% of a man’s daily recommended intake with 3.3 milligrams of zinc per 100 grams. The only issue, of course, is that 100 grams of dark chocolate means 600 calories worth of food, so though dark chocolate has valuable nutrient content, it’s still a food that is best eaten in moderation, and not thought of as a main source of zinc.

12. Fortified Breakfast Cereals

Fortified breakfast cereals are a good source of zinc because they’re designed to make up the difference in specific vitamins and nutrients we’re often lacking in our diets. Great for growing children and adults, certain breakfast cereals will not only provide you with the benefits of zinc, but also with calcium, dietary fiber, and a cavalcade of vitamins.

From A to Zinc

Good sources of zinc like meat, nuts, seafood, dairy, and legumes are great to have as staples in your diet. The foods containing only marginal amounts of this essential mineral are still important too, as they round out your diet in a balanced fashion. Now you know that foods containing zinc are as diverse as they come, from just about every building block on the food pyramid. With their help, you could get regular amounts of zinc every day, and hardly notice the effort!

Do Avocados Have Protein?

Avocados and protein: how much protein do they contain, what else is in an avocado, and is it healthy for you? Find out!

It’s true: plant-based foods, including vegetables and fruits, contain protein. A vegetable with any more than 2 grams of protein is actually considered a high-protein vegetable, though they’ll always score lower than beans, just as beans score lower than meats. Of course, regardless of how an avocado is prepared or how green it can be, the avocado is actually a fruit, with a seed at its center. In fact, more specifically it’s classified as a single-seeded berry. So the short answer to the question, “Do avocados have protein?” is… yes! Avocados do contain protein, and to find out how much, which other fruits have protein, and how you can eat more avocados creatively, read on.

Fruits Containing Protein

The best dietary sources of protein will always be meat, followed by some beans, legumes, and dairy. For example, excellent sources of protein are chicken, turkey, fish and other seafoods, lentils, cottage cheese, and eggs. Other good sources of protein are nuts, nut butters, seeds, milk, green peas, and edamame, but it’s a sharp fall after that.

To be considered a good source of protein, a food should contain over 6 grams of protein, so none of the following fruits contains a significant amount of protein, but that doesn’t mean they don’t contain some protein for your body to use. Here are fruits high in protein, with how much content they have listed in grams per cup, from high to low.

  • Guavas: 4.2 grams of protein per cup (165 g)
  • Avocados: 4 grams of protein per avocado (201 g)
  • Apricots: 2.2 grams of protein per cup (155 g)
  • Kiwifruit: 2.1 grams of protein per cup (180 g)
  • Blackberries: 2 grams of protein per cup (144 g)
  • Oranges: 1.7 grams of protein per cup (180 g)
  • Bananas: 1.3 grams of protein per cup sliced (118 g)
  • Cantaloupe: 1.5 grams of protein per cup (177 g)
  • Raspberries: 1.5 grams of protein per cup (123 g)
  • Peaches: 1.4 grams of protein per cup (154 g)

So, while protein is easily found in animal-based foods, plant-based foods including fruits can provide it as well. Making sure there is a variety of food in your diet and establishing a balanced and healthy eating routine ensures that you’re more likely to get your daily recommended vitamins and minerals. As far as fruits, avocado is only barely beaten by guava in protein content, so it’s not to be counted out.

Do avocados have protein? Find out here

Do Avocados Have Protein That’s Good for You?

Avocados were originally called ahuakatl in the Aztec’s Nahuatl language, a word that meant testicle, referring to the food’s shape. American farmers in California later chose “avocado” to better market the fruit, but only after the original marketing idea of calling it an “alligator pear” didn’t catch on.

Avocados are best known for their healthy fat reputation, but are they healthy in other aspects? Well, it might be interesting to find out that avocados contain a fungicidal toxin that is not injurious or harmful to humans but is potentially poisonous to most animals. Basically, don’t feed any avocado or guacamole to horses, cows, goats, sheep, pigs, rabbits, birds, or fish.

So we humans can eat avocados, but should we, especially for its protein content?

Well, we’ve established that fruits and veggies don’t have a huge amount of protein, and so don’t work so well as a protein replacement.

However, protein does provide amino acids important for building both muscle and body tissue. Along with helping to maintain tissue health, the protein gained from avocados also serves to boost your immune system. Not only that, eating avocados helps you feel more full when you pair your avocado protein intake with other high-protein foods. You’ll appreciate increased satiety and satisfaction that curbs your appetite, which can help with weight loss if that’s your aim. With the protein in avocados, you have plenty of health benefits to gain and nothing to lose.

What Else Is in Avocados?

Besides healthy fats and protein, avocados also contain iron, zinc, potassium, and vitamin E.

Of the two types of avocados that are abundant in the United States (those being Florida and California-grown avocados), the California avocados have darker skin and are richer in taste than the bright green-skinned Florida variety, which have a milder taste. While both have the same amount of valuable fats, the Florida variety is lower in both protein and carbohydrates (which may be a plus or a minus depending on your dietary needs).

The Carbs in Avocados

The energy in avocados primarily comes from their fat content, but avocados do have a fair helping of carbs, specifically about 3 grams of carbohydrates in a 1-ounce serving of California avocados, while it’s closer to 2 grams of carbs in Florida ones. The small amount of sugar in avocados, which is a simple carb, is also slightly higher in California avocados, but nevertheless for both varieties the amount is still less than 1 gram per serving.

The Fiber from Avocados

The above carb content is largely derived from the dietary fiber that avocados have, which is another beneficial contribution from this food. Fiber keeps your digestive system working comfortably, and has been shown to help fight cardiovascular disease. One serving of either kind of avocado produced in the United States offers 2 grams of fiber, which in the body also helps to control blood sugar levels and lower cholesterol levels.

What Science Says About Avocados

The health benefits of avocados have been an area of interest for nutrition researchers. A survey published in Nutrition Journal stated that consuming avocados is associated with a better quality diet and nutrient intake, as well as lower metabolic syndrome in adults in the United States. They also advised that dietitians consider recommending avocado consumption to their patients and clients.

A study on Hass avocados (which originate from California) found that avocado oil helps promote healthy blood lipid profiles and enhances the bioavailability of the fat soluble vitamins obtained from other fruits and vegetables. Researchers highlighted that clinical studies show avocado consumption is associated with cardiovascular health, healthy aging, and proper weight management.

Avocado health benefits work on the inside and the outside. The avocado can be used as a natural cosmetic due to its rapid skin penetration and superior quality as a natural sunscreen. It turns out, the avocado is one of the healthiest things you can put in and on your body.

Ways to Include Avocado in Your Diet

Avocados feature very prominently in vegan and vegetarian diets, where any amount of extra protein is always welcome to help make up for the loss of protein gained from animal meats. If you’re only using avocados in guacamole, you are missing out on a world of new opportunities, especially if you or someone you know needs to make a new and healthier change in their diet from processed food to natural whole foods.

Its creamy texture makes it perfect for a healthy smoothie full of spinach and protein powder. You can also use avocados to make vegan ice cream, cookies, truffles, creme brûlée, or chocolate and peanut butter pudding. If you’re creating a diet that helps someone with diabetes stay off sugary snacks, avocado-based desserts could be a great way to give them a sweet treat without doing them any harm.

You could mash up a fresh avocado and use it as a spread to replace butter (it’s buttery in taste anyway!). Want to make green eggs and ham? Take that healthy avocado mash and combine it with your eggs before scrambling them, and not only do you get a fun color, but you also get a much denser, more balanced breakfast with heightened flavor and texture.

Pro Protein, Pro Avocado

Now that you know avocados are protein packed, consider all the creative ways you can make the avocado a more regular part of your diet if you want to gain all those healthy benefits. Surprise yourself and your loved ones!

What Are Nonpolar Amino Acids?

What are nonpolar amino acids? This article will help explain how these amino acids are designated and what purpose they serve in the body.

Of the 20 common amino acids in the human body that build protein structures, 9 of them are essential (meaning we must eat or otherwise consume them to get them), and half of them are nonpolar. What are nonpolar amino acids? Which are they, and what does “nonpolar” mean? The review of the topic in this article will help explain.

The Definition of a Nonpolar Molecule

The nonpolar molecules we’ll be talking about are hydrophobic amino acids, meaning “water fearing” because they don’t mix with water molecules. You know how oil and water don’t mix? That’s because oil is hydrophobic.

The opposite of a nonpolar molecule is, as you might guess, polar. Polar molecules are hydrophilic, meaning “water loving.” If you’d like to visualize: polar molecules are like puppy dogs who love water so much that they’ll go barreling straight into muddy or smelly water after a tennis ball, with no hesitation at all. That would make nonpolar molecules like cats, better known for avoiding water, no thank you, and cleaning themselves without it.

Molecules are classified this way based on the charges on the atoms bonded together to form the molecule. If you remember your first taste of high school chemistry, you may remember that atoms have a nucleus of neutral neutrons and positive protons in the middle, and negative electrons swirling all around. Protons have a positive charge that draws electrons to it, like how opposites attract.

When two atoms bond together, they share electrons. Two atoms of the same element have equal positivity, so don’t have the power to steal electrons from the other. These molecules are nonpolar because they have no resulting charge. When atoms of two different elements connect together, invariably one of them will have the higher charge and attract the most electrons to its end of the joint molecule. That means the molecule is polar, or charged, and that charge will then be identified as either a positive or negative charge.

Examples of Nonpolar Molecules

Methane gas is an example of a nonpolar molecule that is created during the breakdown of food and released as a gas (or more colloquially, a fart). Methane is made up of one carbon atom that is bound to four hydrogen atoms: this hydrogen bonding allows the atoms to all share electrons equally, so this smelly molecule has no charge and is nonpolar.

Inside our body, we have both polar and nonpolar molecules, which includes those 20 amino acids mentioned above.

Nonpolar Amino Acids

The chemical properties of amino acids are largely determined by one group of molecules, what’s known as the R group: a side chain that differs on each amino acid. To visualize the amino acid groups, picture a pizza with four toppings, and a little support table in the middle that’s there to keep the cheese from sticking to the lid. That table is the alpha carbon to which all the groups or toppings are attached.

Every amino acid has three groups/toppings in common: the amino group (-NH2), the carboxyl group (COOH), and a hydrogen atom, which in pizza terms would be three standard toppings, say pepperoni, sausage, and cheese (cheese is hydrogen, which is just one atom and not a group of them, and so it gets the plainest topping). That fourth quarter of the pizza? That is the R group, the functional group that identifies and characterizes different amino acids—when you think of the R group, think R for Radical, because that is a completely different and unique topping, and every R group amino acid side chain has a distinct flavor of its own. To get up to 20 it would have to be pineapple, spinach, olives, Canadian bacon, jalapeño, garlic, anchovies, bell pepper, salami, feta cheese, beef, oregano, bacon, barbecue sauce, chicken, pesto, chorizo, broccoli, eggplant, and mushroom. Some are weirder than others.

The nonpolar amino acids have R groups mostly made up of hydrocarbons, though the amino acids methionine and cysteine also each feature a sulphur atom. The nonpolar amino acids are as follows, with more information on each one.

Glycine

  • Three letter code: gly
  • One letter code: G

The body needs glycine to make compounds like as glutathione, creatine, and collagen, which is the most abundant protein in your body. Collagen is a vital part of your muscles, blood, skin, cartilage, ligaments, and bones. Glycine may also protect your liver from alcohol damage, contribute to heart health, and improve your sleep quality. Glycine might also protect those with type 2 diabetes from muscle-wasting. You can gain more glycine by eating certain meat products or by taking a collagen supplement.

Alanine

  • Three letter code: ala
  • One letter code: A

Alanine is an amino acid that helps convert glucose into energy and helps eliminate excess toxins from your liver. Alanine keeps muscle protein from being cannibalized by the body during intense aerobic exercise or activity, and it’s needed to balance nitrogen and glucose levels in the body, which it does via the alanine cycle.

Alanine is a nonessential amino acid, which means that usually your body can make the substance on its own and doesn’t need you to ingest it from outside. However, people with eating disorders, extremely low-protein diets, diabetes, liver disease, or certain genetic conditions that cause UCDs (urea cycle disorders), may need to take a supplement or adjust their diet to gain this amino acid.

Good sources of alanine are meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products, as well as some protein-rich plant foods, like avocado. There are supplements containing alanine on the market, however, taking any one amino acid alone could upset the balance of nitrogen in the body, putting stress on the liver and kidneys as they try to eliminate waste. It is advisable that those with liver or kidney disease should consult a trusted medical professional before taking any amino acid supplement.

Proline

  • Three letter code: pro
  • One letter code: P

Proline is needed for the manufacture of cartilage and collagen, which helps heal cartilage and cushion our joints and vertebrae. It keeps joints flexible, and skin supple when it is affected by sun damage or signs of normal aging. Proline breaks down proteins for cell creation, and is essential at sites of injury where the tissue must be rebuilt to heal. Proline supplementation is sometimes valuable to people with chronic back pain or osteoarthritis.

Proline is also needed for the maintenance of muscle tissue, and is sometimes found low in long-distance runners and other serious athletes. Proline is usually nonessential, as the body naturally derives proline from its supplies of glutamic acid. However, if necessary, proline can be found in natural sources like dairy, meat, and eggs, or can be gained from amino acid supplementation.

Valine

  • Three letter code: val
  • One letter code: V

Valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) that works with the other two BCAAs (isoleucine and leucine) to regulate blood sugar, repair tissues, and provide the body with energy. Valine assists in stimulating the central nervous system and is necessary for mental functioning. Valine helps provide muscles with extra glucose energy during intense physical activity, which prevents muscle breakdown, and helps remove toxic excess nitrogen from the liver. Valine may help the liver and gallbladder recover from damage due to alcoholism or drug abuse, as well as help possibly reverse alcohol-related brain damage, or hepatic encephalopathy.

Valine is an essential amino acid, and must be obtained through a diet including meats, mushrooms, dairy products, peanuts, and/or soy protein. Most people have no problem getting enough valine, however maple syrup urine disease or MSUD is caused by an inability to metabolize leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Supplementation is sometimes warranted in those with low-protein diets or who are trying to build muscle mass, but be advised that too much valine intake will make one’s skin feel like it is crawling, and may cause hallucinations. Supplements should always be taken responsibly.

Leucine

  • Three letter code: leu
  • One letter code: L

Leucine helps with blood sugar regulation, muscle repair, and energy production. It also helps burn fat located deep inside the body that is hard to reach through diet and exercise alone.

Leucine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) along with valine and isoleucine, all of which help to promote post-exercise muscle recovery, leucine being particularly effective, as it converts to glucose the fastest of the three. That is also why leucine is closely linked with the regulation of blood sugar, and why a leucine deficiency causes symptoms like hypoglycemia: headaches, fatigue, dizziness, confusion, depression, and irritability.

Leucine promotes the recovery of skin, bones, and muscle tissue after injury or surgery. Natural sources of this essential amino acid are meat, nuts, soy flour, brown rice, beans, and whole wheat.

Isoleucine

  • Three letter code: ile
  • One letter code: I

An isolated form of leucine, isoleucine is prized by bodybuilders for its ability to increase endurance, help repair muscle tissue, and encourage clotting at sites of injury. Isoleucine is broken down for energy inside muscle tissue, and helps stabilize energy levels by aiding in blood sugar regulation. An isoleucine deficiency also produces symptoms that mimic hypoglycemia.

Isoleucine is an essential amino acid, and food sources include high-protein options like nuts, peas, lentils, seeds, meat, eggs, fish, and soy protein.

Methionine

  • Three letter code: met
  • One letter code: M

An essential amino acid that helps the body process and eliminate fat, methionine contains sulfur, a substance required for the production of the body’s natural antioxidant, glutathione. The body also needs methionine to produce two other sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and taurine, which help the body eliminate toxins, build tissues, and promote cardiovascular health.

Methionine helps the liver process fats (lipids), preventing accumulation of too much fat in the liver, which is essential for the elimination of toxins to stay functional. Methionine is needed to make creatine, a nutrient found mainly in muscle tissue and often taken as a supplement to boost athletic performance. Methionine is also needed for collagen formation, which is then used to make skin, nails, and connective tissue. One study suggested that taking 6 grams of methionine a day can improve memory recall in AIDS patients who otherwise show a marked methionine deficiency. Methionine may also help treat symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Methionine is an essential amino acid, and can be gained from eating garlic, beans, seeds, eggs, fish, lentils (in lower levels), meat, onions, soybeans, and yogurt.

Tryptophan

  • Three letter code: trp
  • One letter code: W

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that helps balance nitrogen in adults and growth in infants. It also creates niacin, which is needed to create the “happy” neurotransmitter serotonin. In this way, tryptophan helps influence relief from depression and anxiety, managing pain tolerance and increased emotional well-being. Tryptophan is also associated with promoting deeper sleep.

You can get tryptophan through certain foods or a supplement in powder form. Natural food sources include cheese, milk, fish, turkey (famously), chicken, eggs, pumpkin and sesame seeds, chocolate, as well as tofu and soy.

Phenylalanine

  • Three letter code: phe
  • One letter code: F

Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid that is needed for the functioning of the central nervous system. It has been successfully used to help control feelings of depression and chronic pain, and other diseases linked to a malfunctioning central nervous system. Especially effective for treating brain disorders, phenylalanine is able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, and only chemicals that are able to cross that barrier can directly influence brain function.

Phenylalanine is used to make epinephrine, dopamine, and norepinephrine, neurotransmitters that control how you perceive and interact with the world around you. Phenylalanine supplementation can help you feel happier and more alert, and it also has been used to treat chronic pain and improve cognitive function. An essential amino acid, phenylalanine is normally obtained from high-protein foods like meat, fish, chicken, eggs, milk, dairy products, beans, and nuts.

Cysteine

  • Three letter code: cys
  • One letter code: C

Cysteine is an amino acid containing a sulfur atom, and is used to form healthy bones, skin, hair, and connective tissue. It is also needed to make glutathione, one of the body’s natural antioxidants that fight free-radical damage. Cysteine and glutathione work together to remove toxins from the liver, and cysteine is often used in emergency rooms to treat acetaminophen overdoses before they can cause liver damage. It also protects the brain and liver against toxins from alcohol and cigarettes, and may be useful in preventing hangovers.

Cysteine is a nonessential amino acid, which means the body manufactures it in-house, but foods such as meat, eggs, dairy products, and whole grains are also good sources of cysteine.

Nonpolar Knowledge

There you have the rundown of the amino acid nonpolar side chains, the nonpolar aminos that variously help form protein molecules in our bodies, and do so much to keep us alive and functioning at top form.

Should You Build a Personalized Psoriasis Diet Plan?

While doctors have yet to identify a clear connection between diet and psoriasis symptoms, many people with the condition find that consuming certain foods increases or decreases flare-ups. Learn more about how making better dietary choices can result in psoriasis relief with the psoriasis diet.

Psoriasis, a chronic autoimmune skin disease, develops when the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy skin cells, resulting in a faster rate of cell production. Because the body can’t get shed the excess skin cells quickly enough, they build up, resulting in patches of swollen, red skin. Most common in people between the ages of 15 and 35, psoriasis can be an unpleasant and inconvenient condition. While researchers have yet to find concrete scientific evidence in favor of one specific psoriasis diet, Dr. Paul Yamauchi of the Dermatology Institute and Skin Care Center in Santa Monica, California believes that it can be valuable for individuals with psoriasis to explore whether consuming certain foods increases or decreases flare-ups. Learn more about how making better dietary choices can be part of an overall psoriasis treatment plan.

Building a Personalized Psoriasis Diet Plan

Treating psoriasis can be a challenge. Different medications work for different patients, and sometimes, patients stop responding to previously effective treatments. Many find that complementary therapies and lifestyle changes are an important part of a comprehensive approach to minimizing psoriasis symptoms. Though studies have not shown a clear, consistent connection between diet and symptoms of psoriasis, strong anecdotal reports indicate that the foods someone eats—or doesn’t eat—influence the frequency and severity of their psoriasis outbreaks.

What Scientific Evidence Shows About Psoriasis and Diet

Perhaps the most compelling data on the link between psoriasis and diet comes from a 2017 dietary behavioral study published in Dermatology Therapies. The goal of the study was to examine how dietary habits and interventions adopted by psoriasis patients impacted their skin. To do so, the authors administered a 61-question survey to members of the National Psoriasis Foundation. They received 1,206 responses.

Based on those responses, these foods commonly trigger psoriasis flare-ups:

  • Dairy
  • Gluten
  • Sugar
  • Tomatoes
  • Alcohol

A smaller, but still significant, number of respondents mentioned that eggs, meat, processed foods, and spicy foods caused their psoriasis symptoms to intensify.

In terms of dietary approaches that help minimize symptoms, several options appeared frequently:

  • Gluten free
  • Low carbohydrate, high protein
  • Mediterranean
  • Vegetarian

Respondents also mentioned some specific food groups that they found helped to improve their psoriasis symptoms, including:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Fish

Furthermore, the survey showed that 69% percent of respondents who adopted a psoriasis diet plan experienced weight loss, which scientific evidence shows can be a key part of relieving symptoms of psoriasis for overweight patients.

Learn more about how making better dietary choices can result in psoriasis relief with the psoriasis diet.

6 Foods Known to Trigger Psoriasis Flare-Ups

Removing certain foods and beverages from your diet can have a positive effect on psoriasis symptoms. Because psoriasis is an inflammatory disease, many of the dietary changes that can help you avoid flare-ups fall under the the general guidelines for an anti-inflammatory diet.

Individual bodies have varying responses to different types of food, so the best way to determine which foods trigger psoriasis flare-ups will be to experiment with eliminating one food group at a time and see how that impacts your symptoms. Here are six foods you may want to avoid.

1. Dairy

As mentioned above, psoriasis is an inflammatory condition, and research has found that dairy products—including milk and egg yolks—can increase inflammation levels in the body. Plus, anecdotal reports indicate that cutting back on dairy consumption can reduce symptoms of psoriasis.

If you do choose to include dairy in your diet, registered dietician Heather Mangieri, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, recommends fat-free, 1% fat, or low-fat milk, cheese, and other dairy products.

2. Gluten

According to a study published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, psoriasis patients have higher levels of antibodies linked to gluten sensitivity.

Gluten, a type of protein found in grains such as wheat, barley, and rye, hangs out in breads and pasta as well as other less-expected products such as processed meats and sauces. Following a gluten-free diet requires careful label reading, though as its popularity has increased in recent years, it’s become easier to find designated gluten-free products.

Keep in mind, too, that eliminating gluten doesn’t have to mean giving up baked goods and other foods that contain flour. You’ll simply have to seek out those made with alternative flours.

3. Sugar

Excess sugar consumption not only promotes inflammation, but is also a major factor behind weight gain. Individuals with psoriasis should exercise extra caution when it comes to weight gain, which can worsen symptoms of their skin condition. Plus, psoriasis raises your risk of heart disease, making it important to steer clear of other additional risk factors such as being overweight.

As with avoiding gluten, staying away from added sugar will mean paying close attention to the labels of any packaged foods you eat.

4. Tomatoes

Tomatoes belong to the nightshade family, which some individuals find trigger psoriasis outbreaks. Other members of the nightshade family include white potatoes, eggplant, and peppers.

Though researchers have not found a clear explanation for why tomatoes or other nightshade vegetables would worsen symptoms of psoriasis, it may be beneficial to try eliminating them one by one and noting the effect (if any) on your skin.

5. Red Meat

Studies show that red meat, like dairy, can elevate inflammation levels. This, in turn, can have a deleterious effect on psoriasis symptoms, and some individuals with psoriasis report that cutting out or cutting back on red meat improves their condition.

Additionally, fatty red meats can make you more likely to develop heart disease, and since individuals with psoriasis already have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, it’s vital to make heart-healthy choices a priority.

If you’re not ready to commit to a vegetarian diet, choose lean protein options like white-meat chicken and turkey. And if you do occasionally eat red meat, opt for less fatty cuts like flank steak or sirloin.

6. Alcohol

One of the most common psoriasis triggers, alcohol can both increase inflammation and interfere with psoriasis medications.

Some studies have found a connection between alcohol and psoriasis flare-ups. It appears that alcohol dilates the blood vessels, allowing white blood cells called T cells and other compounds found in the blood greater access to the skin, which heightens the inflammatory response that underlies psoriasis outbreaks. Alcohol also causes dehydration. Both these effects can cause psoriasis symptoms to worsen.

As if that’s not reason enough to exercise great caution when it comes to alcohol, drinking can also lessen the efficacy of psoriasis medications. It can even be dangerous to combine with certain drugs, including methotrexate.

If you’re struggling to control symptoms of psoriasis, you should certainly consider decreasing your alcohol consumption or ceasing to consume it altogether.

6 Foods That Can Help Control Symptoms of Psoriasis

Just as certain foods can contribute to psoriasis flare-ups, others may help control psoriasis symptoms. Studies have shown that specific nutrients can be beneficial for individuals with psoriasis, including antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and selenium. An increased intake of the following foods can reportedly led to fewer flare-ups for psoriasis patients.

1. Fruits

Fruits loaded with vitamin A have been shown to improve the overall health of your skin, which has clear benefits for individuals with psoriasis. Some especially rich sources of vitamin A include:

  • Cantaloupe
  • Mango
  • Watermelon

Other fruits with notable healthful properties relevant to the treatment of psoriasis include blueberries, which contain tons of vitamin C along with manganese and fiber, and strawberries and figs, which have impressive anti-inflammatory properties.

2. Vegetables

As with the preceding category, many of the benefits here come from the anti-inflammatory effects of vegetables such as:

  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Broccoli

Since all types of psoriasis involve inflammation, eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables can reduce symptoms.

Boosting your intake of vitamin D can also be a key part of psoriasis treatment. In fact, during the 1930s, doctors prescribed high oral doses of vitamin D, though that approach has fallen out of favor due to the accompanying side effects. A better option is to focus on vitamin D-rich foods, like dark, leafy greens and mushrooms.

3. Fish

It’s a well-known fact that omega-3 fatty acids, a type of essential fatty acid found in some kinds of fish, can lower inflammation. Plus, according to the American Heart Association, eating fatty fish at least 2 times per week can lower your risk of heart disease.

Some good options include:

  • Albacore tuna
  • Mackerel
  • Salmon
  • Herring
  • Sardines
  • Lake trout

Given those dual benefits, individuals with psoriasis should aim to eat at least two servings of omega-3 fatty acid-laden fish weekly.

4. Seeds, Nuts, and Other Plant-Based Fat Sources

If you prefer to stick to a plant-based diet, it’s still possible to provide your body with plenty of omega-3 fatty acids.

Flaxseeds and pumpkin seeds are remarkably good sources of these essential fatty acids, as are walnuts. Just 1/4 of a cup of walnuts can provide more than 100% of your recommended daily allowance for omega-3s.

Other heart-healthy options for plant-based fats include olive oil, coconut oil, and avocados.

5. Legumes

Eating high-fiber foods, like legumes, has been linked with lower inflammation levels and better regulation of blood sugar. Since legumes also contain antioxidants, they’re an extra-desirable source of fiber for psoriasis patients.

According to a 2015 study, adopting a diet that prioritizes the consumption of legumes can lower markers of inflammation such as CRP levels as well as decrease PASI scores (a measure of the severity of psoriasis).

6. Herbs and Spices

Some psoriasis patients find that specific herbs and spices can reduce symptoms of the skin condition. Some herbs have a long history of use as anti-inflammatory aids and immune system boosters, such as:

  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Sage
  • Ginger
  • Turmeric
  • Evening primrose
  • Milk thistle

While some items on that list can be incorporated into your cooking, others are best taken in the form of herbal supplements. In order to take a medically significant amount, supplements may be the best option no matter what.

If you’re working around dietary restrictions, or simply need more support when it comes to managing your psoriasis symptoms, you may wish to try dietary supplements that contain nutrients with anti-inflammatory properties and other helpful effects, such as:

  • Fish oil
  • Turmeric capsules
  • Evening primrose oil
  • Milk thistle capsules
  • Vitamins A, B, C, D, and E

Because some studies have shown that psoriasis patients who are overweight or obese suffer more flare-ups, it’s common for health care professionals to recommend taking steps to reach or maintain an optimal weight for your body.

When it comes to weight loss, as well as minimizing the physical and mental toll of psoriasis, it can be tempting to try a fad or extreme diet. However, doing so can rob your body of the nutrients necessary for healthy living. If you decide to make major alterations to your diet, you may wish to consult with a doctor or an expert in nutrition to ensure that you won’t be causing harm while trying to heal yourself.

The High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Connection

Hypertension occurs when blood pressure is consistently too high. What is the high blood pressure heart disease connection? Find out here!

Nicknamed the silent killer due to its hidden symptoms, high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) occurs when blood pressure is consistently too high. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), approximately half of all Americans have high blood pressure, and many are unaware they have it.

With every beat of your heart, blood pumps through arteries, veins, and capillaries. Two forces create the pressure we refer to as blood pressure: systolic pressure as blood travels out into the arteries, and diastolic pressure as the heart rests between heartbeats. You’ve likely seen these two types of pressure measured in a blood pressure reading.

  • The top number is your systolic pressure, and the normal range is less than 120 mm Hg.
  • The bottom number is your diastolic blood pressure, with less than 80 mm Hg being the targeted range.

What is the high blood pressure heart disease connection? High blood pressure makes the heart and blood vessels work harder and less efficiently, damaging the tissues inside the arteries over time. LDL cholesterol (the bad kind) forms plaque along the artery walls and narrows the arteries, raising blood pressure. This can ultimately lead to heart disease and heart attack, among other health problems such as kidney disease, sexual dysfunction, and dementia.

What Causes High Blood Pressure?

There are two types of high blood pressure: primary hypertension, which does not have a discernable cause and tends to develop gradually over many years, and secondary hypertension, which tends to appear suddenly and create higher blood pressure compared to primary hypertension. Various lifestyles, conditions, and medications can lead to secondary hypertension. Let’s take a look at the primary risk factors.

Symptoms of High Blood Pressure

While hypertension symptoms typically remain quiet, if your blood pressure is extremely elevated, you may experience the following side effects:

  • Excruciating headache
  • Lethargy
  • Confusion
  • Vision impairment
  • Shortness of breath
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Blood in the urine
  • Pounding in your neck, ears, or chest

High blood pressure is considered a “silent killer”

Does High Blood Pressure Cause Heart Disease?

High blood pressure can damage your body for years without showing symptoms, and if it is left untreated, it can lead to disability or a heart attack. Half of the people with uncontrolled high blood pressure die of cardiovascular disease related to poor blood flow and another third die of stroke.

High blood pressure can damage your arteries and heart in the long run. High blood pressure increases the pressure of blood flowing through your arteries, and uncontrolled high blood pressure can damage your heart in many different ways.

Damaged Arteries

High blood pressure can damage the inner lining of your arteries. The fat that you eat enters your bloodstream and collects in the damaged arteries. With time, artery walls become less elastic, and they limit blood flow throughout your body.

Aneurysm

The pressure of blood flowing through a weak artery can form a bulge in the arteries, which is called an aneurysm. Aneurysms are more common in the body’s largest artery (aorta), and they can cause life-threatening internal bleeding.

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease narrows the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle and prevents blood from flowing freely through the arteries. This can lead to chest pain, a heart attack, or irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias).

Enlarged Left Heart

High blood pressure makes your heart work harder to pump blood, causing the thickening of the left ventricle. The ventricle is not able to pump blood to your body anymore, and the risk of heart attack, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death may increase.

Heart Failure and Attack

In the long term, high blood pressure can weaken your heart muscle, and eventually, your heart simply fails and struggles to perform vital tasks. This can lead to a heart attack.

High blood pressure is considered a “silent killer”

How to Treat High Blood Pressure

If you have high blood pressure, a healthy lifestyle can play a key role in treating this condition so you can avoid prescription medications.

Lose Weight

Losing weight is one of the most effective ways to lower blood pressure. Just 10 pounds of weight loss can make a marked difference. Focus on your waistline—carrying too much weight around the middle can increase your risk of high blood pressure.

Eat Healthy

A diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and amino acids is ideal. This eating plan is known as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. Avoid saturated fats and trans fats, and reduce your salt consumption. Even a small reduction in sodium can lower blood pressure by 2 to 8 mm Hg. Reading food labels is an excellent habit. Eat fewer processed foods, and do not add extra salt to your meals—just 1 level teaspoon of salt has 2,300 mg of sodium. Replace salt with herbs and spices.

Click here for 16 foods that help lower blood pressure!

Exercise Regularly

Regular exercise helps prevent high blood pressure, especially for those with prehypertension (systolic 120-129 mm Hg and diastolic less than 80 mm Hg) who are teetering on full-blown hypertension. Consistent physical activity can significantly lower your blood pressure. It’s as simple as walking, jogging, cycling, and swimming and engaging in a strength training program.

Reduce Alcohol

If you are 65 years old and older, avoid drinking more than one drink a day. If you are younger, drinking more than two drinks a day might have consequences later in life. And indulging in alcohol can raise your blood pressure by several points and stymie the effectiveness of blood pressure medications.

Avoid Smoking

Smoking can affect your body in many different ways, one of which is to raise your blood pressure, and not just when you’re smoking but for several minutes after. Quitting smoking helps your blood pressure return to normal.

Reduce Caffeine

The jury is still out on how significantly caffeine impacts blood pressure levels, but you can test how you react to caffeine to know how it affects your blood pressure. First check your blood pressure to get a base reading. Then, test your blood pressure numbers within 30 minutes of drinking a caffeinated beverage. If your blood pressure increases 5 to 10 mm Hg, you may be sensitive to the effects of caffeine.

Reduce Stress

Chronic stress most assuredly raises high blood pressure. Mindfulness and breathing techniques can help you cope with stress, but introspective work to know your stress triggers is crucial. Practice gratitude and learn to accept the things that you cannot change.

Monitor Your Blood Pressure

Blood pressure monitors are available widely and without a prescription, and they can help you keep your blood pressure in check. Follow the tips mentioned above, and alert your doctor if you experience health complications. If your blood pressure is under control, you might need to visit your doctor only every 6 to 12 months, but if your blood pressure is not controlled, your visits might become more frequent.

Get Support

The support of your family and friends is key to your health. They may notice health-related issues that you do not see, be an advocate for your health and medical treatment, and even jump on board a new exercise program that can help keep your blood pressure readings in the normal range.