How to Speed up Healing: From Sunburns to Surgery Recovery

The wound healing process, much like our physical activity levels, tends to decline as we age. Here are some scientifically backed tips on the best ways to speed up healing, from minor cuts and scrapes around the home, to post-surgical recovery and muscle tissue rebuilding.

Whether you have a cut, a burn, or are healing from a surgical procedure, there are ways to help speed up healing and close your wounds faster. The wound healing process, much like our physical activity levels, tends to decline as we age. The older we get, the longer our healing time takes, leading in some instances to chronic wounds that never really go away. To speed up wound repair, here are some tips for helping your body along.

Speed up healing: from sunburns to surgery.

At-Home Healing: Small Wounds and Scar Reduction

When it comes to home remedies for wound care, there are a lot of old wives’ tales still around. Some of them make a certain amount of sense when considered scientifically, like waiting 30 minutes to swim after you eat may well help you avoid a minor cramp. However, not all of these folktales are true enough to keep repeating or insisting on. Not everyone will get a minor cramp if they swim after eating, and even if they do, it won’t cause them to drown. And yet still we wait, and tell children to wait, and keep the myth going.

When it comes to how to speed up wound healing, there are a lot of practices that don’t really apply. Some say leaving a wound open to dry in the air and “breathe” helps it heal faster, but that isn’t true if it’s now open to dirt and possible infection. To stop infection, many douse a wound in alcohol or peroxide—talk about pouring salt on a wound!

In truth, leaving a wound to dry out is not ideal, and can even slow healing and increase pain. Wounds need moisture to heal, and moist wound healing speeds up healing and reduces scarring. Here are some other tips on how to foster faster healing and reduce the risk of scarring.

1. Clean and Disinfect

Before touching a wound, wash your hands. When it comes to cleaning the wound, start with clear water and a clean cloth to remove any dirt or particles from the wound. If there are pieces of debris in a wound (your kid took a wipeout on their skateboard and has gravel embedded in the scrape, for example), use a pair of tweezers to remove them. The tweezers should be sterilized with some isopropyl alcohol, but alcohol is not advised directly on the open wound.

Instead, once the wound is clean, apply an antibiotic cream, ointment, or spray to the wound area, and make your call about what kind of bandage applies. If it’s an open wound like a wide scrape, a gauze and a wrap may be called for, but a cut on a finger might need only a bandaid to reduce the risk of infection and speed healing.

Remember not to pick at any scab that forms, because a scab is the body’s natural bandage.

2. Encourage Blood Flow

Nobody can heal you better than your own body, but there are ways to help it along. You’ll notice when you get a scrape or a bruise that the area seems to heat up. That’s because the body has dispatched its in-house medical team via your bloodstream.

To increase blood flow to the skin and surrounding area, you can apply a heating pad or hot water bottle, or place the wound area in some warm water for 15-30 minutes. It’s not a high-tech method but it does help, especially for wounds on your extremities (fingers, toes, arms, and legs) where your blood vessels are smaller, or for anyone with poor circulation, like the elderly.

If adding heat is uncomfortable, massaging the surrounding area is another way to usher blood to the site of injury.

3. Reduce Inflammation

After encouraging healthy blood flow, your wound may experience unhealthy inflammation. A burn that you got from pulling dinner out of the oven might feel like it’s still burning for days after, and you’ll want some kind of anti-inflammatory to help relieve the pain.

Many people think of the gel-like insides of the aloe vera plant for burns, and this is an age-old home remedy that actually works! Aloe vera is a succulent plant originally native to Africa that has a gooey substance in its leaves called mucilaginous juice, and while the plant is 99% water, it does have two chemicals within that improve wound healing.

According to researchers, many of the healing effects of aloe vera are due to the glycoproteins and polysaccharides present in the plant’s pulp. The polysaccharides increase cellular movement, leading to faster tissue regrowth, and the glycoproteins help relieve pain and control the inflammatory response. Together these compounds aid and possibly improve your immune system.

There is even more evidence out of a 2015 study that suggests there are further helpful compounds in aloe vera for cutaneous wounds (like sunburns). For instance, glucomannan stimulates the growth of fibroblasts responsible for collagen, skin cell, and tissue building. Other chemicals found in aloe vera may also help foster blood vessel regrowth, making it a fantastic, natural anti-inflammatory to have on hand for minor wound healing.

4. Get More Protein, Vitamins, and Nutrients

There are certain power foods that contain the nutrients your body needs to rebuild itself, including vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and magnesium. You’ll find these nutrients in dark green leafy vegetables and in orange, yellow, and red fruits and veggies (eat the rainbow!), like bell peppers, tomatoes, oranges, and more.

One of the biggest factors when it comes to tissue and wound healing though? Protein. Omega-3s come from fish along with fish’s protein content, and you can get an assortment of your essential amino acids from various meats and dairy products.

Amino acids are needed for wound healing, so if you’re not a meat-eater, you can increase your protein intake with certain vegetarian and vegan protein foods, or with an amino acid supplement while you heal.

How to Speed up Healing After Surgery

Outside of household and playground injuries, recovery after surgery is a whole different ball game. No matter where it is on the body or how good the chances for a speedy recovery are, surgery still carries a certain amount of risk, and so does surgical recovery. Once you’re sent home from your procedure, you’re going to want to heal as quickly and safely as possible. Here are some tips for how to do so.

1. Follow Your Doctor’s Instructions

While it’s true that no one knows your body quite like you do, doctors don’t give out suggestions willy-nilly. Their medical advice is based on data and research collected from all different kinds of patients over years and years of procedures.

If a doctor tells you to avoid activities for a specific amount of time after a procedure, it’s in your best interest to heed that advice. If you’re told to avoid driving, avoid sexual intercourse, avoid alcohol, or avoid lifting anything over 10 pounds for a couple of weeks, this is for your safety, and so you don’t end up back in their office with a new injury or complication. You may be feeling good enough to return to normal activity, and that’s great, it means your healing is right on course! And yet there may still be healing processes going on beneath your skin that need a little bit more time.

2. Eat the Right Recovery Foods

As true as it was for minor wounds, eating a nutrient-dense diet is even more important after a surgery, because you’re healing much deeper wounds. Although you may have a loss of appetite or digestive discomfort after a surgery, it’s important that you eat a healthy diet by any means necessary (broths, smoothies, amino acid powders), because certain foods are actually going to feed your recovery process.

Again, vitamin C and zinc can help with healing, and can be had from fruit and beans. Iron and vitamin B12 help in forming new blood cells and can be found in fish and eggs. Sports and sugary drinks should be avoided for the time being, as should refined sugar foods.

Protein is more important than ever, as many surgeries by nature involve cutting through tissue and muscle, and the amino acids in protein can help speed post-surgical recovery. Meat, poultry, fish, and eggs are all strong sources of protein, but if a doctor tells you to take a protein supplement, look for a comprehensive amino acid supplement. For recovering after surgery, you may need more protein than a normal diet or your appetite can provide, and supplementing may be a necessity.

3. Follow-up, Ask For Help, and Get Moving Gradually

Surgical recovery may take a while and involve follow-up appointments, physical therapy, and/or at-home assistance. During this time, it’s important to keep all appointments with your health care team, because a diagnostic such as bloodwork could alert your doctor to a problem before it becomes an infection. Likewise, physical therapy could help you correct something like a limp before it becomes a misalignment.

Asking for help from your family or your medical team may not be your usual tendency, but it is necessary and encouraged for the sake of a speedy and successful recovery. If problems are allowed to fester, you could end up back in the hospital or on bedrest, and in danger of new problems altogether, like muscle atrophy.

4. Don’t Smoke

This is a tip that may not apply to all, so if you don’t smoke or have never smoked, skip ahead. However, if you are a smoker or live with one, the effects of cigarette smoking can counteract your wound healing.

Nicotine tightens blood vessels, and the more constricted your blood vessels are, the harder it is for all the other recovery work you’re doing to matter. The nutrients you eat won’t be going to the right places, the muscle you’re building takes longer to thrive, your wounds take longer to heal, and more carcinogens and harmful substances are coming in at the same time. If you’ve ever wanted to quit smoking, after a surgery it’s more important than ever, and can make even more of a positive health impact.

The Need for Speed

Some things can’t be rushed, and a lot of the time your health is the tortoise racing against the hare: slow and steady wins the race. Diet and exercise are long-haul habits that make all the difference. While that’s also true when it comes to a lot of aspects of healing, the more you can do to support your body’s healing mechanisms and get out of their way, the faster the process goes and the lower the chance you’ll have any more problems arising from the initial issue.

Whether it’s a cut, a sunburn, a broken limb, or a surgical operation, anything can go from bad to worse if you’re not careful. Luckily there are resources you can use and advice to be had on how to speed up healing in a successful and sustainable way. Take these tips into consideration, seek medical advice if needed, and know that we wish you a speedy recovery.

What Are Nonpolar Amino Acids?

What are nonpolar amino acids? This article will help explain how these amino acids are designated and what purpose they serve in the body.

Of the 20 common amino acids in the human body that build protein structures, 9 of them are essential (meaning we must eat or otherwise consume them to get them), and half of them are nonpolar. What are nonpolar amino acids? Which are they, and what does “nonpolar” mean? The review of the topic in this article will help explain.

The Definition of a Nonpolar Molecule

The nonpolar molecules we’ll be talking about are hydrophobic amino acids, meaning “water fearing” because they don’t mix with water molecules. You know how oil and water don’t mix? That’s because oil is hydrophobic.

The opposite of a nonpolar molecule is, as you might guess, polar. Polar molecules are hydrophilic, meaning “water loving.” If you’d like to visualize: polar molecules are like puppy dogs who love water so much that they’ll go barreling straight into muddy or smelly water after a tennis ball, with no hesitation at all. That would make nonpolar molecules like cats, better known for avoiding water, no thank you, and cleaning themselves without it.

Molecules are classified this way based on the charges on the atoms bonded together to form the molecule. If you remember your first taste of high school chemistry, you may remember that atoms have a nucleus of neutral neutrons and positive protons in the middle, and negative electrons swirling all around. Protons have a positive charge that draws electrons to it, like how opposites attract.

When two atoms bond together, they share electrons. Two atoms of the same element have equal positivity, so don’t have the power to steal electrons from the other. These molecules are nonpolar because they have no resulting charge. When atoms of two different elements connect together, invariably one of them will have the higher charge and attract the most electrons to its end of the joint molecule. That means the molecule is polar, or charged, and that charge will then be identified as either a positive or negative charge.

Examples of Nonpolar Molecules

Methane gas is an example of a nonpolar molecule that is created during the breakdown of food and released as a gas (or more colloquially, a fart). Methane is made up of one carbon atom that is bound to four hydrogen atoms: this hydrogen bonding allows the atoms to all share electrons equally, so this smelly molecule has no charge and is nonpolar.

Inside our body, we have both polar and nonpolar molecules, which includes those 20 amino acids mentioned above.

Nonpolar Amino Acids

The chemical properties of amino acids are largely determined by one group of molecules, what’s known as the R group: a side chain that differs on each amino acid. To visualize the amino acid groups, picture a pizza with four toppings, and a little support table in the middle that’s there to keep the cheese from sticking to the lid. That table is the alpha carbon to which all the groups or toppings are attached.

Every amino acid has three groups/toppings in common: the amino group (-NH2), the carboxyl group (COOH), and a hydrogen atom, which in pizza terms would be three standard toppings, say pepperoni, sausage, and cheese (cheese is hydrogen, which is just one atom and not a group of them, and so it gets the plainest topping). That fourth quarter of the pizza? That is the R group, the functional group that identifies and characterizes different amino acids—when you think of the R group, think R for Radical, because that is a completely different and unique topping, and every R group amino acid side chain has a distinct flavor of its own. To get up to 20 it would have to be pineapple, spinach, olives, Canadian bacon, jalapeño, garlic, anchovies, bell pepper, salami, feta cheese, beef, oregano, bacon, barbecue sauce, chicken, pesto, chorizo, broccoli, eggplant, and mushroom. Some are weirder than others.

The nonpolar amino acids have R groups mostly made up of hydrocarbons, though the amino acids methionine and cysteine also each feature a sulphur atom. The nonpolar amino acids are as follows, with more information on each one.

Glycine

  • Three letter code: gly
  • One letter code: G

The body needs glycine to make compounds like as glutathione, creatine, and collagen, which is the most abundant protein in your body. Collagen is a vital part of your muscles, blood, skin, cartilage, ligaments, and bones. Glycine may also protect your liver from alcohol damage, contribute to heart health, and improve your sleep quality. Glycine might also protect those with type 2 diabetes from muscle-wasting. You can gain more glycine by eating certain meat products or by taking a collagen supplement.

Alanine

  • Three letter code: ala
  • One letter code: A

Alanine is an amino acid that helps convert glucose into energy and helps eliminate excess toxins from your liver. Alanine keeps muscle protein from being cannibalized by the body during intense aerobic exercise or activity, and it’s needed to balance nitrogen and glucose levels in the body, which it does via the alanine cycle.

Alanine is a nonessential amino acid, which means that usually your body can make the substance on its own and doesn’t need you to ingest it from outside. However, people with eating disorders, extremely low-protein diets, diabetes, liver disease, or certain genetic conditions that cause UCDs (urea cycle disorders), may need to take a supplement or adjust their diet to gain this amino acid.

Good sources of alanine are meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products, as well as some protein-rich plant foods, like avocado. There are supplements containing alanine on the market, however, taking any one amino acid alone could upset the balance of nitrogen in the body, putting stress on the liver and kidneys as they try to eliminate waste. It is advisable that those with liver or kidney disease should consult a trusted medical professional before taking any amino acid supplement.

Proline

  • Three letter code: pro
  • One letter code: P

Proline is needed for the manufacture of cartilage and collagen, which helps heal cartilage and cushion our joints and vertebrae. It keeps joints flexible, and skin supple when it is affected by sun damage or signs of normal aging. Proline breaks down proteins for cell creation, and is essential at sites of injury where the tissue must be rebuilt to heal. Proline supplementation is sometimes valuable to people with chronic back pain or osteoarthritis.

Proline is also needed for the maintenance of muscle tissue, and is sometimes found low in long-distance runners and other serious athletes. Proline is usually nonessential, as the body naturally derives proline from its supplies of glutamic acid. However, if necessary, proline can be found in natural sources like dairy, meat, and eggs, or can be gained from amino acid supplementation.

Valine

  • Three letter code: val
  • One letter code: V

Valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) that works with the other two BCAAs (isoleucine and leucine) to regulate blood sugar, repair tissues, and provide the body with energy. Valine assists in stimulating the central nervous system and is necessary for mental functioning. Valine helps provide muscles with extra glucose energy during intense physical activity, which prevents muscle breakdown, and helps remove toxic excess nitrogen from the liver. Valine may help the liver and gallbladder recover from damage due to alcoholism or drug abuse, as well as help possibly reverse alcohol-related brain damage, or hepatic encephalopathy.

Valine is an essential amino acid, and must be obtained through a diet including meats, mushrooms, dairy products, peanuts, and/or soy protein. Most people have no problem getting enough valine, however maple syrup urine disease or MSUD is caused by an inability to metabolize leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Supplementation is sometimes warranted in those with low-protein diets or who are trying to build muscle mass, but be advised that too much valine intake will make one’s skin feel like it is crawling, and may cause hallucinations. Supplements should always be taken responsibly.

Leucine

  • Three letter code: leu
  • One letter code: L

Leucine helps with blood sugar regulation, muscle repair, and energy production. It also helps burn fat located deep inside the body that is hard to reach through diet and exercise alone.

Leucine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) along with valine and isoleucine, all of which help to promote post-exercise muscle recovery, leucine being particularly effective, as it converts to glucose the fastest of the three. That is also why leucine is closely linked with the regulation of blood sugar, and why a leucine deficiency causes symptoms like hypoglycemia: headaches, fatigue, dizziness, confusion, depression, and irritability.

Leucine promotes the recovery of skin, bones, and muscle tissue after injury or surgery. Natural sources of this essential amino acid are meat, nuts, soy flour, brown rice, beans, and whole wheat.

Isoleucine

  • Three letter code: ile
  • One letter code: I

An isolated form of leucine, isoleucine is prized by bodybuilders for its ability to increase endurance, help repair muscle tissue, and encourage clotting at sites of injury. Isoleucine is broken down for energy inside muscle tissue, and helps stabilize energy levels by aiding in blood sugar regulation. An isoleucine deficiency also produces symptoms that mimic hypoglycemia.

Isoleucine is an essential amino acid, and food sources include high-protein options like nuts, peas, lentils, seeds, meat, eggs, fish, and soy protein.

Methionine

  • Three letter code: met
  • One letter code: M

An essential amino acid that helps the body process and eliminate fat, methionine contains sulfur, a substance required for the production of the body’s natural antioxidant, glutathione. The body also needs methionine to produce two other sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and taurine, which help the body eliminate toxins, build tissues, and promote cardiovascular health.

Methionine helps the liver process fats (lipids), preventing accumulation of too much fat in the liver, which is essential for the elimination of toxins to stay functional. Methionine is needed to make creatine, a nutrient found mainly in muscle tissue and often taken as a supplement to boost athletic performance. Methionine is also needed for collagen formation, which is then used to make skin, nails, and connective tissue. One study suggested that taking 6 grams of methionine a day can improve memory recall in AIDS patients who otherwise show a marked methionine deficiency. Methionine may also help treat symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Methionine is an essential amino acid, and can be gained from eating garlic, beans, seeds, eggs, fish, lentils (in lower levels), meat, onions, soybeans, and yogurt.

Tryptophan

  • Three letter code: trp
  • One letter code: W

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that helps balance nitrogen in adults and growth in infants. It also creates niacin, which is needed to create the “happy” neurotransmitter serotonin. In this way, tryptophan helps influence relief from depression and anxiety, managing pain tolerance and increased emotional well-being. Tryptophan is also associated with promoting deeper sleep.

You can get tryptophan through certain foods or a supplement in powder form. Natural food sources include cheese, milk, fish, turkey (famously), chicken, eggs, pumpkin and sesame seeds, chocolate, as well as tofu and soy.

Phenylalanine

  • Three letter code: phe
  • One letter code: F

Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid that is needed for the functioning of the central nervous system. It has been successfully used to help control feelings of depression and chronic pain, and other diseases linked to a malfunctioning central nervous system. Especially effective for treating brain disorders, phenylalanine is able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, and only chemicals that are able to cross that barrier can directly influence brain function.

Phenylalanine is used to make epinephrine, dopamine, and norepinephrine, neurotransmitters that control how you perceive and interact with the world around you. Phenylalanine supplementation can help you feel happier and more alert, and it also has been used to treat chronic pain and improve cognitive function. An essential amino acid, phenylalanine is normally obtained from high-protein foods like meat, fish, chicken, eggs, milk, dairy products, beans, and nuts.

Cysteine

  • Three letter code: cys
  • One letter code: C

Cysteine is an amino acid containing a sulfur atom, and is used to form healthy bones, skin, hair, and connective tissue. It is also needed to make glutathione, one of the body’s natural antioxidants that fight free-radical damage. Cysteine and glutathione work together to remove toxins from the liver, and cysteine is often used in emergency rooms to treat acetaminophen overdoses before they can cause liver damage. It also protects the brain and liver against toxins from alcohol and cigarettes, and may be useful in preventing hangovers.

Cysteine is a nonessential amino acid, which means the body manufactures it in-house, but foods such as meat, eggs, dairy products, and whole grains are also good sources of cysteine.

Nonpolar Knowledge

There you have the rundown of the amino acid nonpolar side chains, the nonpolar aminos that variously help form protein molecules in our bodies, and do so much to keep us alive and functioning at top form.

Best Amino Acids for the Ketogenic Diet: Which Ketogenic Amino Acids Should You Be Eating?

The value of a ketogenic diet? To burn fat rather than just lose weight on the scale. The core question: in what foods can the six essential ketogenic amino acids be found?

The value of a ketogenic diet? To burn fat rather than just lose weight on the scale. Beginners at dieting often attempt to lose weight with short-term crash diets, which put the body in starvation mode and cause it to stockpile more fat as soon as possible (an evolutionary protection against times of famine). Conversely, the ketogenic diet puts the body into more of a sustainability mode, a stable way to reduce and optimize calorie intake, while focusing on foods that provide the essential amino acids for the ketogenic conversion of fat into energy.

So which ketogenic amino acids should you be eating, and where can you find them?

Amino Acids: the Fat Burning, the Sugar Forming, and the Switch Hitters

The building blocks of protein, amino acids can be categorized as exclusively ketogenic, exclusively glucogenic, or like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: radically both. This is based on the end products produced during amino acid metabolism.

Essential amino acids for the ketogenic diet.

As you can see, the predominant category is the glucogenic group, with 13 amino acids. The carbon skeletons that result from the breakdown of glucogenic amino acids can be used via gluconeogenesis to synthesize glucose, simple sugar and an important energy source found in many carbohydrates. These are not the amino acids that will derive energy from your body’s pre-existing fat stores.

The second largest category contains five amino acids, the switch hitters that when catabolized can yield both glucogenic and ketogenic products.

Exclusively ketogenic amino acids are just that: exclusive. Lysine and leucine are the only two amino acids that produce Acetyl CoA or Acetoacetyl CoA without any glucogenic byproducts.

Acetyl CoA (the precursor of ketone bodies) and Acetoacetyl CoA are the first steps of the Krebs Cycle of energy production, which combines glycolysis and pyruvate oxidation with the citric acid cycle (which itself includes α-ketoglutarate, succinyl CoA, fumarate, and oxaloacetate—all byproducts of glucogenic amino acids). To access citrate synthase, the catalyst of this cycle, without glucose or carbohydrates is the value of ketogenic amino acids: it’s like buying the product you need without bringing home any unnecessary or harmful packaging around it.

Acid Eater: the Amino Acids Essential to a Ketogenic Diet

Classes of amino acids can be further categorized as essential vs. nonessential, essential being the ones you must eat to obtain, and nonessential being those that naturally occur in the body, and are not reliant on the food you eat.

Nonessential amino acids:

  • Asparagine
  • Alanine
  • Glutamic acid
  • Aspartic acid

Essential amino acids:

  • Histidine
  • Valine
  • Methionine
  • Isoleucine
  • Phenylalanine
  • Threonine
  • Tryptophan
  • Leucine
  • Lysine

You may have noticed those last two are the exclusively ketogenic amino acids, meaning they only come from sources outside the body. Likewise, four out of five of the switch hitter or versatile amino acids are on this essential list as well, excluding only tyrosine, a conditional essential, as it’s derived from phenylalanine (which is itself essential). Regardless of that particular debate, the core question remains: in what foods can the six essential ketogenic amino acids be found?

The Key Ingredients to Ketogenesis

Intro 101 of the keto diet is to go deeper when dieting, to the cellular level of biological sciences. This is more advanced than the grocery aisle surface choices people often make between low-carb and no-sugar-added options. It’s important to remember that the colorful labeling on the front of food packages can often be subjective. It’s better to know how to read the nutrition label with a keen (keto) eye.

Better yet, know what basic foods have the ketogenic keys to turn fatty acids into ketone bodies. These ketone bodies will then provide energy from your fat stores, without adding carbohydrates, and without impacting insulin or blood sugar levels. Here are where the six essential ketogenic amino acids reside.

1. Isoleucine

Along with leucine and valine (glucogenic), isoleucine is an isomer (isolated form) of leucine that is one of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), all of which help to promote post-exercise muscle recovery. Involved in hemoglobin production, isoleucine can be found in:

  • Protein sources like meat, fish, and eggs
  • Dairy, particularly cottage cheese
  • Seeds, grains, nuts, and beans including almonds, brown rice, cashews, lentils, and chia seeds

2. Phenylalanine

The source of tyrosine and one of the aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine is used in the biosynthesis of norepinephrine, dopamine, and thyroid hormones (huge players when it comes to mental health). Possibly effective in treating mood disorders, phenylalanine is contained in:

  • Olives, figs, raisins, avocados, pumpkins, and most berries
  • Meat, chicken, fish, and eggs
  • Rice, beans, quinoa, and seeds
  • Spirulina, seaweed, and leafy greens

3. Threonine

An essential nutrient in the diet of vertebrates, threonine supports the central nervous system, along with the heart, liver, and immune system. A key component in the production of collagen, elastin, and muscle tissue, threonine can be gained from:

  • Beans, nuts, lentils, and quinoa
  • Lean beef, lamb, pork, and chicken/turkey
  • Seafood including shellfish, particularly salmon, whelks, cuttlefish, octopus
  • Seeds, including chia and hemp seeds
  • Raisins, figs, avocados, and pumpkin
  • Spirulina, watercress

4. Tryptophan

Needed for nitrogen balance, tryptophan is also used to produce melatonin (for regulating sleep and wakefulness), niacin, and serotonin, the neurotransmitter known as the “happy” chemical. Tryptophan can be found in:

  • Turkey (rather famously), as well as red meat, rabbit and goat meat, eggs, and fish
  • Milk and cheese, particularly reduced fat mozzarella
  • Pumpkin and squash seeds, along with chia, sesame, and sunflower seeds
  • Almonds, peanuts, bananas, and chocolate (ideal ingredients for a sundae)
  • Spirulina

5. Leucine

Another of the BCAAs, and one of the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, leucine builds muscle by stimulating protein synthesis. It can be sourced from:

  • Nuts, peas, beans, seeds, and pumpkins
  • Chicken, beef, and pork
  • Seafood including tuna
  • Soybeans, whey protein, and plant proteins
  • Cheese, particularly Parmesan

6. Lysine

Necessary in the formation of collagen, connective tissue, and muscle growth and repair in the body, lysine can be found in:

  • Protein sources like meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs
  • Beans, peas, almonds, cashews, and chia seeds
  • Spirulina, parsley
  • Cheese and yogurt
  • Whey protein

The Ketogenic Conclusion

You may have noticed some foods dominating the field; when it comes to essential amino acids for a ketogenic diet, where you find a good source of protein, you often find the ketogenic advantage. Donald K. Layman, Ph.D. along with Nancy R. Rodriguez, Ph.D. penned a paper for Nutrition Today titled “Egg Protein as a Source of Power, Strength, and Energy,” but in it pointed out that egg is not the only food that packs that much value. With so many high-yield proteins, any dietary practice—be it vegetarian, vegan, kosher, or allergy-restrictive—can still gain you the essential amino acids for perfecting your ketogenic journey if you’re diligent about ensuring your protein macros.

Your body is not so much a temple as a laboratory, a series of chemical reactions. Providing your body with the right ketogenic amino acids (instead of an overabundance of glucose precursors) sets you up for the ideal fat-burning catabolic pathways. This leads to healthy protein turnover for muscle growth, weight loss, and the energy to propel you forward.

Taking an essential amino acid supplement (which includes the ketogenic amino acids lysine and leucine) can help protect against any protein insufficiencies you may encounter while following dietary restrictions, such as the high-fat, moderate-protein requirements of the keto diet.

Foods That Are Rich in Sulfur and Why You Should Be Eating More of Them

A diet that contains sulfur-rich food is necessary for keeping connective tissue flexible and helping the body detox and metabolize food. Get enough sulfur by eating a protein-rich diet that includes Brussels sprouts, kale, meat, and eggs.  

As an essential mineral found in proteins and the amino acids cysteine and methionine, sulfur is a critical nutrient for the human body. Sulfur is most likely known best for its sulfur compounds, which give garlic its distinctive aroma, cause tears when chopping onions, and lend a funky smell to urine, but sulfur does so much more. The mineral stabilizes and shapes some protein structures, aids in metabolism and detoxification, and keeps connective tissue and cartilage supple, making it essential that our diets contain sulfur-rich foods.

Good Sources of Sulfur-Rich Foods

Sulfur doesn’t discriminate by diet. Whether you’re a meat lover or a plant-based eater, there’s a wealth of sulfur-rich foods to choose from.

Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Other Proteins

Building and maintaining healthy skin, nails, and hair depend on protein-rich foods, such as fish, poultry, meats, nuts, and legumes. Packed with protein, eggs are also an optimal source of sulfur, which is found in both the egg yolk and the white, although sulfate content is higher in egg whites.

Protein-rich foods contain sulfur in the form of the amino acids cysteine and methionine. These amino acids provide the amounts of sulfur our cells need to function properly. In addition to helping make protein, sulfur serves as a cofactor for enzymes that result in chemical reactions.

Cruciferous Vegetables

Many fibrous, often green and non-leafy vegetables fall into the category of sulfur-rich vegetables. Cruciferous vegetables, such as wasabi, horseradish, cabbage, kale, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower, pack a punch when it comes to nutrients.

Brussels sprouts, asparagus, and legumes also are very high in methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), which provides a major source of sulfur. Additionally, these cruciferous veggies provide healthy doses of fiber, vitamins C, E, and K, folate, and carotenoids, as well as the sulfur-containing chemicals known as glucosinolates. Thank these chemicals for the bitter flavor and distinctive, pungent aroma that set cruciferous vegetables apart from so many others. When glucosinolates break down, for example during digestion, they form compounds, including indoles and isothiocyanates. Researchers have studied these specific compounds most often for their anti-cancer effects. Studies have shown that the compounds, indoles, and isothiocyanates can have antiviral and antibacterial effects, as well as anti-inflammatory properties.

Alliums

Other foods high in sulfur include allium vegetables, like leeks, garlic, chives, and onions. They contain organic compounds that contain sulfur, and studies in animals have shown that these vegetables may help prevent esophagus and colon cancers. Though more clinical trials need to be performed to determine their efficacy in humans, this research shows that the cancer-fighting potential of alliums warrants further exploration.

Stay healthy with a sulfur-rich diet.

Understanding Amino Acids

Most commonly referred to as the building blocks of protein, amino acids assist in many biological functions. There are 20 amino acids in protein. Nine of them are essential, which means we must get them through nutrition because our bodies don’t produce them on their own. Since our bodies do not store them, adults need to eat healthy diets to get these nine essential amino acids: valine, leucine, lysine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, threonine, and histidine.

The other remaining amino acids fall into the categories of nonessential and conditionally essential. Nonessential amino acids are naturally occurring in our bodies, and we can also get them from the foods we eat. Alanine, asparagine, and aspartate are examples of nonessential amino acids.

Arginine, glutamine, tyrosine, cysteine, glycine, proline, serine, and ornithine are both nonessential and conditionally essential. This means our bodies synthesize them, but during times of sickness or stress, we may not be able to produce the amount we need. In those instances, we must ensure our amino acid needs are met through our diets or with supplementation.

Only two amino acids, methionine and cysteine, contain sulfur. Methionine is critical for good health because it is required to build proteins and produce many molecules in the body, including SAM, which is used to modify DNA. Methionine also plays a critical role in many cell functions and helps prevent liver damage in acetaminophen poisoning.

Why the Consumption of Sulfur Foods Matter

In addition to providing strength and resiliency to hair, sulfur assists in many other biological processes.

Sulfur is needed to synthesize the tripeptide glutathione, which is a chain of three amino acids that is joined by two peptide bonds. Not only is glutathione a key antioxidant, but it also regulates a number of cellular processes. It helps to control the rapid production of cells, aids in the detoxification of foreign organisms and free radicals, and influences immune function.

Sulfur is integral in binding together the two chains of amino acids that form the hormone insulin, which regulates our bodies’ sugar use. Taurine synthesis also depends on sulfur. Taurine is an organic compound that contains sulfur and plays an important role in metabolizing fats, restoring insulin sensitivity, and supporting the general functions of muscles and the central nervous system.

How Much Sulfur Do We Need?

The recommended dietary allowance set forth by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences for methionine plus cysteine is 14 mg/kg of body weight per day. Regardless of age or sex, a person weighing 70 kilograms would need to consume about 1.1 grams per day.

Who Suffers from Low Sulfur Levels

Though sulfur is one of the most abundant minerals in our bodies and many foods contain the mineral, we can suffer from low sulfur levels. First, the American diet often includes many processed foods and carbohydrates, and not many high-protein foods. A low-protein diet can result in low sulfur levels. Sometimes, those who eat little or no protein from animals, such as vegetarians and vegans, also may have lower amounts of sulfur in their systems.

Even when we eat balanced diets, we may not have the sulfur content levels we expect. Overcooking sulfur-rich foods can compromise their nutrition, negatively impacting the amount of the mineral our bodies get. Also, industrialized farming practices impact the levels of sulfur in the soil where crops grow. The bottom line is that if we are not buying and consuming local, organic produce or acquiring our meat and produce from grass-fed animals, there’s a very great chance we are not getting the essential vitamins and minerals our bodies need.

The Ulcerative Colitis Diet Plan: Best and Worst Foods When Living with UC

If you live with ulcerative colitis, you may be looking for a diet that gives you the essential nutrients you need, but doesn’t worsen the inflammation and discomfort that goes with your condition. While food isn’t a cure-all for any disease, it can help you minimize your symptoms and boost your overall health.

If you’re one of the nearly million of Americans living with ulcerative colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease, you may be looking for an ulcerative colitis diet that gives you the essential vitamins and nutrients you need but doesn’t worsen the inflammation and discomfort that goes with your condition. While food isn’t a cure-all for any disease, it can help you minimize your symptoms of ulcerative colitis and boost your overall health. Here is an overview of the best and worst foods to eat when you’re living with ulcerative colitis.

A Quick Look at Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, inflammatory disease that causes inflammation and ulcers in your digestive tract, specifically your large intestine. It is one of the most common inflammatory bowel diseases along with Crohn’s disease. The exact cause of ulcerative colitis is unknown, but experts have determined that it manifests when your immune system mistakes healthy tissue and food as harmful and begins attacking your intestines.

Ulcerative colitis symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain, persistent urge to have a bowel movement, rectal bleeding, appetite loss, weight loss, fatigue, and fever. You may be able to identify what trigger foods cause your UC to worsen. Following a certain diet can be the best treatment option for reducing flare-ups and maintaining a healthy digestive tract.

Best Foods for Ulcerative Colitis

A nutrient-rich, balanced diet supports your overall health and reduces the discomfort associated with ulcerative colitis.

Oatmeal

Start your day with oatmeal, an easily digestible breakfast that will keep you full longer. Oatmeal is a high-fiber food, so if you’re on a low-fiber diet, choose the instant variety instead of steel-cut. You want to avoid mixes high in sugar. Instead sweeten your bowl with cinnamon, fruit, or a spoonful of honey.

Salmon

Packed with omega-3 fatty acids, salmon helps lower inflammation, raises good cholesterol levels, and promotes your overall health. Other good sources of omega-3s include walnuts, flaxseed, and albacore tuna.

Avocado

If you are trying to pack on some pounds in a healthy way or looking for a good source of beneficial fats, give avocados a try. Substitute for mayonnaise on your sandwich, spread it on your toast, or add avocado to a salad or side dish.

Squash

Adding squash to your diet is an easy and delicious way to get needed vitamin C, antioxidants, fiber, and beta carotene. Available in many varieties, squash helps soothe inflammation, encourages the repair of damaged tissue, and supports good gut bacteria. Try dicing, shredding, or mashing acorn, spaghetti, zucchini, or butternut squash.

Yogurt

Yogurt, sauerkraut, kefir, and miso contain probiotics that help support proper digestion and boost immune health. These foods contain active, live cultures that nourish the good gut flora that is needed for a healthy digestive system. Avoid high-sugar options by choosing unsweetened or plain varieties.

Applesauce

Unsweetened applesauce, either from the store or homemade, adds potassium, fiber, and other valuable vitamins to your diet. Flavor it up with cinnamon or by mixing in berries, and incorporate applesauce into your favorite baked recipes.

Eggs

Easy to digest and packed with protein, eggs are a quick meal any time of day. Full of vitamins, protein, and antioxidants that help combat inflammation, eggs are a good addition to a UC diet. Whether hard boiled, scrambled, or over easy, eggs make for a nutrient-packed addition to your weekly meal plan.

Lean Meats

When in search of low-fat protein options, look for lean meats such as pork loin, chicken, turkey, and sirloin. Read the package when selecting ground meat choices to ensure it is as lean as possible.

Bananas

Easy on the stomach and packed with vitamins, bananas can help with digestion because they have a smooth consistency and light flavor. Bananas are often recommended following the stomach flu as part of the BRAT diet, as they can help calm digestive upset and inflammation.

White Rice

Easy to digest, lower in fiber than whole grains like brown rice, and filling, white rice can be incorporated into your midday meal or dinner to help soothe UC symptoms. Follow the instructions on the box or bag for cooking softer rice.

If you live with ulcerative colitis, you may be looking for a diet that gives you the essential nutrients you need, but doesn’t worsen the inflammation and discomfort that goes with your condition. While food isn’t a cure-all for any disease, it can help you minimize your symptoms and boost your overall health.

Worst Foods for Ulcerative Colitis

When living with ulcerative colitis, you may find there are certain foods that cause your symptoms to instantly worsen. For instance, high-fiber options may be difficult to digest and cause more discomfort during a flare-up. Finding foods that are lower in fiber but still rich in other nutrients can help prevent irritation. Here are several foods you may want to avoid if you are living with UC.

Alcohol

Put that cork back in the wine bottle. Alcohol can cause the lining of your colon to become irritated, worsening inflammation and potentially leading to bleeding and bloating.

Non-Absorbable Sugars

Stay away from sugar-free foodstuffs like sugar-free gum and candy. They’re packed full of sugar alcohols like sorbitol and mannitol and can cause bloating, gas, and diarrhea.

Tea and Coffee

While you may want a morning cup of joe, coffee and tea contain stimulants that push food through the colon at a much quicker rate, irritating the colon lining and possibly worsening symptoms. It is best to stick to non-caffeinated herbal teas if willpower allows.

Carbonated Drinks

Soda and carbonated water can cause gas and inflame your stomach and intestines. Plus, the added caffeine, artificial sweeteners, and sugar can be cause your UC to flare up.

Broccoli

You may be relieved to know you don’t need to eat your broccoli. This vegetable takes a long time to move through your digestive system and can lead to bloating and gas. All varieties, raw or cooked, are best to avoid if you have ulcerative colitis. Other raw fruits and vegetables can cause similar symptoms, so it’s best to track consumption with a food diary.

Refined Sugar

While sugary foods are a delicious treat (who can stay away from a bowl of ice cream every now and then?), they are not a good addition to an ulcerative colitis diet plan. Processed foods with high sugar draw liquid from your digestive tract and speed digestion, leading to colon irritation and diarrhea.

Nuts

While they do make for a healthy high-fat snack, nuts and nut butters are often more difficult to digest and can clog up the colon. Want to take advantage of the healthy fats and nutrients in nuts? Choose ground varieties or make your own powder to mix into smoothies, butter, or other liquids.

Creamy Foods

Mac n’ cheese and pasta alfredo are undeniably tasty, but heavy creams and cheese can be very irritating to your digestive tract, leading to rectal bleeding and making ulcers more painful. It’s best to cut out margarine, butter, mayo, lard, and cream cheese when following a UC diet.

Speaking of creamy, lactose is a sugar found in dairy products like cream, soft cheeses, and milk, that can aggravate UC symptoms.

Spicy Foods

If you have colitis, you’ll want to turn down the heat by cutting out hot peppers and sauces. Spicy foods and hot sauce can lead to a flare-up by enraging the digestive system and causing diarrhea.

Sulfur Foods

Foods high in sulfur include soy, wheat bread and pasta, peanuts, almonds, cured meats and red meats, and wine and beer, all of which can lead to increased gas and bloating.

Cabbage and Brussel Sprouts

Brussel sprouts and cabbage are best to keep off your plate since they can be very irritating to your colon. Swap out these cruciferous vegetables for squash, carrots, and potatoes.

More Ulcerative Colitis Diet Tips

The best approach for determining ulcerative colitis foods to eat and avoid is to use a food journal. You will soon be able to identify which foods trigger symptoms and which foods seem to help. It may also help to eat smaller meals throughout the day.

Speak to your doctor or nutritionist to get helpful recommendations that will soothe your UC and provide the most vitamins and nutrients needed for optimal health.

You can also supplement your diet with calcium, folic acid, vitamin B12, and amino acids. L-arginine and L-glutamine are amino acids that are used to build protein and are known for their anti-inflammatory properties.

Ulcerative colitis does not have a cure but you can successfully manage your symptoms, support healthy digestion and immune function, and improve your quality of life by following good nutrition principles and a well-balanced diet plan.

The Best Animal Sources of Essential Amino Acids

Not all animal products contain the same amount of protein—and different cuts of the same meat contain different amounts of amino acids. Each tissue may have a different amino acid composition, determined by the specific function of the organ. So let’s find out what are the best animal sources of amino acids!

Without protein, we’d be a gelatinous mess. Protein gives structure and strength to the muscles, tendons, tissues, and organs in our bodies. This powerful macronutrient helps produce enzymes, chemicals, and hormones the body requires for virtually all biological processes. We need protein, and the building blocks that make them, to survive and thrive.

Animal products are considered the best sources of protein because they contain all nine of the building blocks of protein…the famous essential amino acids:

  • Histidine
  • Isoleucine
  • Leucine
  • Lysine
  • Methionine
  • Phenylalanine
  • Threonine
  • Tryptophan
  • Valine

Amino acids make up proteins by linking together in a specific sequence and forming their signature protein. Protein sources that contain the nine amino acids in adequate proportions are called complete proteins, and they are the highest quality protein sources from dietary protein.

Not all animal products contain the same makeup of amino acids, and different cuts of the same meat contain different amounts of protein. Each tissue has a unique amino acid composition, determined by the specific function of the organ.

Way back in 1943, researchers analyzed the amino acid makeup of protein in 10 muscle meats:

  1. Beef
  2. Veal
  3. Lamb
  4. Pork
  5. Chicken
  6. Turtle
  7. Codfish
  8. Salmon
  9. Frog legs
  10. Shrimp

And six beef organ tissues:

  1. Liver
  2. Kidney
  3. Brain
  4. Heart
  5. Stomach
  6. Lung

The results show that these various classes of animals do not differ widely in their amino acid composition—the only significant difference was found in the presence of lysine, an essential amino acid critical to immune system health. The organs had similar amino acid compositions to the muscle tissues, but with lower lysine contents.

The takeaway? It’s important to eat a varied diet of both animal- and plant-based protein to ensure adequate consumption of dietary amino acids. We’ll cover the differences between the two below, but first, let’s get clear on the best animal sources of amino acids, so you can be sure you’re providing your body with the protein it needs to live a strong and healthy life.

5 Best Animal Sources of Amino Acids

No matter what type of meat you eat—beef, chicken, or fish—it’s important to upgrade the quality in order to sustain the health gains. Processed meat like cold cuts, hot dogs, and sausage links that have been smoked, salted, cured, dried, or canned contain harmful chemicals and have been linked to chronic diseases such as hypertension, heart disease, bowel and stomach cancers, and COPD.

When choosing from the animal sources of protein below, opt for pasture-raised and grass-fed meats and animal byproducts to make sure you’re getting all of protein’s health benefits. When it comes to fishing, it depends on the fish: some fish are healthier sourced as wild-caught, while farm-raised fish can occasionally be a better choice.

1. Beef

Beef is a top-notch protein source, but the nutritional quality and quantity of saturated fats and amino acids depends on the cut and how the animals are raised. Steer clear of industrially raised livestock in favor of grass-fed animal sources.

The different parts of the cow also have different flavors; some are more tender and flavorful, while others are quite tough.

Round and back leg are the leanest cuts of beef, and they are perfect grilled. Lean cuts of beef provide about 31 grams of protein in each 3-ounce serving. A good rule of thumb is that the fattier the cut, the lower the protein content per gram. Hindquarters pretty much match the protein and saturated fat content of lean cuts of beef, and can be delicious when marinated overnight for enhanced flavor. The lower loin is a good source of protein and lower in fat, but tough, so it depends on your palate.

The quality of a protein food source depends not only on the protein and essential amino acid content, but also on its digestibility. Different cuts of beef not only have differing amounts of protein, but they also differ in terms of digestibility. Digestibility determines how much of the protein in beef actually gets into the body. For example, the digestibility of ground beef is greater than that of flank steak.

2. Pork

Pork is another good source of protein, but certain cuts contain a significant amount of fat. Ham comes from the leanest cuts of pork in the hindquarters and the lower half of the pig. There are 19 grams of protein and 2.2 grams of saturated fat in 85 grams of ham, while 85 grams of pork tenderloins contains 24 grams of protein and 1.3 grams of saturated fat.

3. Eggs

Just one egg has about 6 grams of protein. Egg whites might not be the best part of the egg in terms of flavor, but they are the leanest protein source. A single egg white contains 3.6 grams of protein and no fat. Egg whites house nearly half of all the protein in an egg, plus magnesium, potassium, and riboflavin, while the yolks contain many essential vitamins.

4. White Meats

White meats such as chicken and turkey are particularly rich in essential amino acids and contain less fat and cholesterol than red meat does. A 3-ounce serving of chicken or turkey breast has about 28 grams of protein. Chicken breast is the leanest source of chicken, but turkey is a better alternative if you’re concerned about consuming too much saturated fat—for every 85 grams of roasted turkey breast you’re getting 26 grams of protein and a saturated fat content less than 0.5 grams.

5. Shellfish and Fish

Shrimp and scallops contain all the essential amino acids. Eighty-five grams of shrimp provides 20 grams of protein and zero saturated fat, and 85 grams of steamed scallops contains 17 grams of protein and only 0.2 grams of saturated fat.

Fish is also an excellent amino acid-rich animal food. A 3-ounce serving of halibut, tuna, or salmon provides about 22 protein grams. Coldwater fish like rainbow trout contains amino acids and is also rich in omega-3 fatty acids, making it a win for your health. Eighty-five grams of this fish baked offers up 20 grams of protein with a saturated fat content of 1.3 grams.

How many grams of protein are in our favorite meats?

What About Plant Protein?

While animal protein certainly wins the gold star in amino acid makeup, we shouldn’t limit our protein consumption to animal sources. Red meat supplies a hearty helping of amino acids, but should be eaten sparingly due to its equally high supply of fat and cholesterol, which has been linked to diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. The same can be said about dairy products, which are also high-protein sources. Aim to eat no more than 1 to 2 servings of dairy per day.

Filling your plate with low-fat, high-quality protein from plant sources such as legumes, seeds, nuts, and whole grains, lowers your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes and ensures you get all the essential amino acids your body needs.

How Much Protein Do I Need to Eat?

The amount of protein that we need depends on our weight. Per kilogram of body weight for an adult, the recommended protein intake is 0.8 grams daily, or a little over 7 grams for every 20 pounds.

  • A 110-pound person needs a minimum of about 40 grams of protein each day.
  • A 210-pound person needs a minimum of about 74 grams of protein each day.

It’s important to consider that these are the minimum targets for protein, and don’t reflect your individual weight, health, or fitness goals. If you are looking to build muscle mass for instance, your daily protein needs are substantially greater, and can easily be boosted with a protein powder supplement. Likewise, if you’re recovering from illness, injury, or surgery eating enough protein can be tricky and made easier with an amino acid powder blend.

If you’re looking to increase your protein intake without taking in unnecessary calories from the carbohydrates and fats found in dietary protein such as animal and plant foods, check out our amino acid blends scientifically formulated for health benefits like weight loss, weight gain, heart health, liver health, muscle growth and more!