Yoga and the Brain: How Yoga Can Boost GABA Levels

Did you know downward-facing dog can positively affect your brain chemistry? Turns out yoga and your brain make great pals. Researchers have found that practicing yoga may elevate brain gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) levels, your brain’s primary inhibitory neurotransmitter.

Did you know downward-facing dog can positively affect your brain chemistry? Turns out yoga and your brain make great pals. Researchers have found that practicing yoga may elevate brain gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) levels, your brain’s primary inhibitory neurotransmitter.

A good yoga class can leave you feeling relaxed, focused, and completely Zen. Practicing this 10,000-year-old form of exercise can increase your flexibility, muscle strength, and energy, but did you know downward-facing dog can positively affect your brain chemistry too? Turns out yoga and the brain make great pals. Researchers have found that practicing yoga may boost brain gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) levels, your brain’s primary inhibitory neurotransmitter.

What Is GABA?

If the only GABA you have heard of is Yo Gabba Gabba, don’t feel discouraged. The GABA in your brain isn’t as well-known as its fellow chemicals serotonin and dopamine, but it is just as important. Naturally occurring brain chemicals called neurotransmitters send messages in between nerves cells. Gamma-aminobutryic acid, or GABA, is the “downer” neurotransmitter that regulates many of the depressive and sedative actions in your brain tissue.

GABA is critical for relaxation and is thought to reduce feelings of anxiety and fear by decreasing neuronal excitability. In other words, it helps to chill you out and hits the brakes on an overactive and unruly mind. This chemical is vital to the healthy function of your nervous system and plays a big role in helping you unwind in the evening and allowing you to transition to sleep.

People with depression and anxiety have been shown to have low amounts of GABA, and medicines often used to treat these disorders increase GABA levels. A dip in this chemical has also been noted in people who have survived a distressing event or have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. Scientists have also noted up to 30% less GABA levels in those who suffer from insomnia.

Did you know downward-facing dog can positively affect your brain chemistry? Turns out yoga and your brain make great pals. Researchers have found that practicing yoga may elevate brain gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) levels, your brain’s primary inhibitory neurotransmitter.

Your Brain on Yoga

Lifestyle practices that combine breathing, stretching, and relaxation, like yoga, have been shown to positively impact GABA receptors and may offer a natural way for you to balance the chemicals in your brain. A 2007 study looking at the effects of yoga on brain GABA levels found that practicing yoga postures was associated with increased levels. A group of experienced yoga practitioners had a 27% increase in GABA after one hour, compared to the group who sat and read for an hour. Those in the group who were new to yoga had a 13% GABA boost over a 12-week period. Researchers concluded that while subjects can be trained to practice yoga in a relatively short time with a measurable effect, the associated change in GABA levels may increase with experience.  

Did you know downward-facing dog can positively affect your brain chemistry? Turns out yoga and your brain make great pals. Researchers have found that practicing yoga may elevate brain gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) levels, your brain’s primary inhibitory neurotransmitter.

Another related study examined the effects of yoga on mood, anxiety, and brain GABA levels compared to the effects of walking. It found that practicing yoga did increase GABA and the yogis reported a greater improvement in their moods and a drop in their anxiety levels. The 12-week yoga intervention was the first study of its kind to show that an increase in GABA levels is tied to improved mood and decreased anxiety.

The findings from both studies have promoted further research into yoga as a possible treatment for depression and anxiety disorders associated with low GABA levels. It has yet to be determined if yoga is the most effective activity or if other physical activities offer the same results.

On top of boosting GABA levels, yoga can help release serotonin naturally. Serotonin controls your mood and social behavior, appetite and digestion, sleep patterns, and overall state of well-being. Serotonin levels increase while you are concentrating on breathing and putting your focus on mindfully being in the moment. Plus, the areas of the brain that respond to stress and send out hormones in response to such stressors are deactivated during this time.

Yoga and meditation also increase activity in the happiness-producing regions of the brain: the left prefrontal cortex. As you go into lotus position, you’re reducing stress hormones and increasing “feel-good” endorphins, an effect coined the “yoga high.” The pituitary gland in the brain releases these endorphins, which then find receptors within the central nervous system to attach to. This binding of endorphins to receptors activates a reaction that blocks the brain from receiving messages of pain. With this blockage, chemicals that trigger swelling and inflammation are stalled.

Overall, this ancient practice has been shown to have a huge impact on both mental and physical well-being. So, does becoming a yogi produce great GABA gains? It might be worth a try. Grab your yoga mat and go!

Author: Amino Research

Experts in amino acid research, the Amino research team works tirelessly to give you the most up-to-date amino acid and health information available. We’re dedicated to helping you transform your body and mind using the power of amino acids and wellness best practices that enhance quality of life and longevity.

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